Top 5 Things You Need to Know About the Quaker Parrot

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Piper!!

Quakers (Scientific name is Myiopsitta Monahus) are fun medium-sized parrots (11 – 13 inches) that come in the colors of green, blue, pallid blue and pallid yellow (amongst other colors). Their normal color is green. They are intelligent and a handful if you don’t know how to interact and manage them. I made this list up because anytime someone hears that I have a Quaker parrot their first comment is “OMG, now that’s a squawker! Don’t you find it to be loud?” I feel a lot of parrots get stereotyped wrong and Quakers are one of those that are misunderstood. So here is my list of the top 5 things you need to know about the Quaker parrot.

These are things that every Quaker parent needs to know:

1) Quakers are known to be vocal
– Yes, they are on the list as one of the top 10 talkers however talking is an ability that a bird will either care to do or not. It strictly depends on the individual parrot. Our Quaker, Piper talks a lot however we talk to him a lot so I’m sure that made a difference.
– When we first got Piper he would make noise at the top of his lungs. I thought OMG what did I get myself into? I was certain my neighbors would complain and I was ready to get rid of this noisy bird. So screeching is something this parrot will do – it all depends on if you have the time and patience to train it out of it’s noisy calls. I don’t have that issue with Piper anymore.

2) inquisitive
– They are very curious birds. If you want a bird that wants to know and see everything, you found it. Nothing will get passed a quaker. With that being said, I literally mean nothing, so if you are missing items or can’t find something shiny, don’t be surprised if you find it with your Quaker.
– This also means that they will want to be able to see and be involved in everything, so don’t leave them out.

3) Independent
– Quakers are known to be independent birds. Our Piper has no problem being around us but he isn’t demanding for attention (at least not physical attention). He will play nicely on his play perch and as long as he is near us, he is content. He doesn’t need to be physically on you.
– They have a bit of an attitude to them and they are not afraid to tell you their mind. They are very bold and can be aggressive when needing to make a point. I found when we clipped Piper’s wings is when he became bitey as that was his only defense mechanism. Once his wings grew back, the aggressiveness disappeared.

4) Time consuming
– This I believe goes across the board for all parrots – They need time! However I think a lot of people get so caught up with they need a certain amount of time that if they find they can’t give them that 3 hours a day, they put them up to be re-homed. Quakers would benefit from being out of their cage for minimum 2.5 hours a day however Quality over Quantity comes into play here. If you can only have your Quaker out for an hour one day, that is okay as long as you make that hour count. It’s better you have them actually out for a complete hour with you than have them out for 5 hours and they are just sitting on a perch, bored. When my parrots are out but feel I am not spending any time with them, they fly right back to their cages. A cage is their home, just like your home is your home. Do you go outside every day? As long as you are stimulated at home then you are okay. This is by no means saying it is okay to keep a parrot caged, all I’m saying is if one day a week you are too busy to give your parrot their usual time out of their cage – Don’t panic just make sure you do make the time that you do have together count regardless if it is 10 minutes or 10 hours. Make it count!

5) Training
If you’ve been following my blog (if you don’t follow me, then please do) then you know I’m a big advocate for training parrots. This doesn’t change when it comes to Piper. As a matter of fact, I think Quakers are so much fun to train as they have the drive to learn and can be very enthusiastic about it. There is this article that talks about how the author trained her Quaker parrot to go from being a biter to a painter, so you see training is a very important aspect to possibly all your problems.

 

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Re-Homing

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So, I’m finally able to start posting again and I don’t ever want to stop. I never realized it before but I truly enjoy sharing my knowledge with other people. Now this is more of a sad post than anything else… I re-homed 2 of my parrids :(.

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(Internet pic)

Story:

I found myself in a financial bind and needed to find a way out so I started working 2 fulltime jobs :(. I did that for almost 6 months straight (hence why I couldn’t post). I only had time to sleep and shower whenever I was home. I still had 2 days off a week but those were my only 2 days to clean, spend time with the kids, catch up on sleep as I was only sleeping about 3 hours a day during the week and get errands done. So my parrids were being neglected. Literally they were in jail and only being fed pellets. Even the cleanliness of their cages were suffering. I felt guilty but what could I do? I was stuck between a rock and a hard place. My kids were suffering too: weren’t getting mommy’s home cooked meals anymore, couldn’t help my son with homework, so his grades dropped. There comes a time when a person has to choose family life over paying off bills…. I finally made that decision.

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Family First (internet pic)

6 months of being away was enough for me plus I was pregnant at the same time (this I didn’t find out until later) so you can imagine how drained I was. I finally left one job and stayed with my night job but then my night job became more stressful as the day person wasn’t doing their job and my pregnancy couldn’t handle the stress so the doctor put me on sick leave. I was sad because my financials would definitely take another hit but on a more positive note – My family could see me again.
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As I’m sure you know Lovebirds who are not interacted with daily can turn away from being hand tamed very quickly which is exactly what happened with our Peach-faced Lovebird, Boss. Now with that being said, Boss always had a bit of attitude in her anyways, hahaha. I could have definitely spent the time to re-train her but I knew what she wanted. She was really showing breeding tendencies and at this time she was sharing a cage with her best friend, Piper, our Quaker parrot but he couldn’t satisfy her needs, so I decided to rehome her into a breeding program. I always knew that I might have to do that with Boss as she was parent raised and I seen her wants long before it became completely obvious. I put an ad up on Kijiji for her and within a day found a man in Brampton who was trying to breed lovebirds. We spoke for a bit and I gave her to him. It warmed my heart to hear his feedback on her. He loved her, she was completely tame with him. He was so impressed with her that he wanted to know if I had more birds I could give him. Unfortunately not, but I was happy to know he was happy and that she would be happy. I do miss her from time to time but I know she is getting what she wanted so my heart is at ease.

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Boss doing “touch/grab” taming. I call it the hovering method.

The next parrid I had to say bye too was one of my rainbow lorikeets. I still very much miss her but again the home where she was given too had nothing but positive feedback to say about her. Lorikeets are just like Lovebirds in a sense, where if you don’t interact with them daily they can revert back very quickly and that’s exactly what happened with Marlee. Rasta was more trusting of us so it wasn’t long ’til I was able to get him back around. With Marlee now, she didn’t want anything to do with me or the kids or anything. She was giving me a hard time to even clean her cage, change her food bowls or anything. Within a few days I had several inquiries for her but one inquiry stood out more than the rest. So I gave her to that household. Marlee kept flying back to me like she didn’t want me to leave her and that broke my heart but I spoke to the female and she said Marlee is doing WONDERFUL. She was nipping when I first dropped her off but soon stopped. The family loves her and she gets a lot of out of the cage time.

Rehoming parrots is not easy when you truly care about their well-being. Piper, our Quaker was down for a while when Boss first left but since then he has come around and is very happy. I can’t remove her favorite toy out of his cage or else he will get upset so I know he hasn’t forgotten her but he has moved on from the heartbreak. Rasta, our green-naped lorikeet kept calling for his sister for a few days after she was gone but he too has come around and doesn’t call for her anymore. Marlee has only been gone for 2 week from this post being posted.

Talk about hidden blessings though because when this was all happening a female contacted me asking if I could take her 2 cockatiels named Chiko and Maro. At first I was just going to give them to a friend of mine who wanted a cockatiel but they are new to the parrot world and I think two parrots would be a lot for a new owner, so we’ve added them to our flock. They came with their cage and a new bag of food. I bought them some new toys and they are very happy joining the flock. Still not sure if I will give them to my friend however I told them to do a bit more research before I would be willing to even consider it so we’ll see.

We lost 2 parrids but we gained two more. Rehoming love ones is never easy but if you must please try and find them the best loving home possible.

Parenting Parrots