Grayson’s first word

Image

The first time a parrot ever spoke to me was Grayson, the grey! We had had him since he was 4 months old and I thought that I may have lucked out and gotten a grey that wouldn’t speak because at 12 months I still didn’t hear him utter a word. Then one day, I was walking past his huge white cage and all I seen is him standing very tall and straight by the front of his cage and he whispered, “Grayson”. I stopped and starting jumping for joy, so excited for the revelation that my Grey did in fact have a voice and his first words were his name, “Grayson”. It sounded like a little baby whispering.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2F1FloeticJustice%2Fvideos%2F10153119770610375%2F&show_text=0&width=267

I would say “What’s your name?” and he would respond with his name.
Absolutely amazing!! This was our start to a wonderful vocabulary. He is 5 now and very shy to talk in front of strangers and although I think his vocab should be further along, I’m still in awe when I hear him respond correctly to a question, or singing a tune that we’ve played or calling out another parrot’s names and telling them to step up.

1509136987083
Grayson saying his first word gave me the same feeling as hearing a baby talk for the first time. Joy, excitement and nervousness because  you now realize your little baby has hit another milestone and is growing up. I’ll never forget Grayson’s first words, not just because I have it on video but because he was the 1st parrot to talk to me and there was an innocence about him that unfortunately he no longer has hahaha.

DSC_0294

Grayson eating an orange

 

 

Parenting Parrots

Advertisements

Birdtricks’ Steps

Image

I have to put all these training methods to the test before I can recommend them to my followers, so if you know of any other training methods out there please let me know… This one is www.birdtricks.com run by 2 brothers who have no formal training but claim to be able to change any behavioral issues your bird may have. As long as your parrot isn’t sick, they believe any problems can be fixed using their methods. Great!! So I have 7 parrots but I’m also trying out the Parrot Wizard’s methods so I have to be careful not to intertwine the two. The funny thing is I just found out the parrot wizard used to work for Birdtricks so I’m sure they are going to have some similarities.

If you look at my training for the Parrot Wizard I had 3 birds that I was trying the method on: Grayson, who is a 5 yr old African grey. Piper who is a 3 yr old Quaker parrot a.k.a monk parakeet and Marlee who was new to our flock at the time and was only a 4 and a half months old green-naped lorikeet. I didn’t stick to that training so I’ll be re-starting it over and some birds will have to be changed as Marlee was rehomed.

I will put Grayson and one of our new members who has yet to be introduced to you guys, a female baby violet Indian Ringneck on the Birdtricks program and the other new member which is a black lory along with Piper on the Parrot Wizard Program. I’m leaving out Rasta, Nyx and Ringo for now just in case I come across other bird training programs that I want to test out or that you guys find and want me to test out. Of course one for my own program which may have a combination of all the programs I test out or it may be something completely different, who knows but only time will tell.

So back to Birdtricks, right now I’m reading their pamphlet called New Parrot Care and I was told this is the first thing I should read and it is titled “How to get my parrot to love me“. Chapter one is setting up your parrot for success: Cage, diet, toys, perches, showers. Great! Grayson and the female Indian Ringneck (although she hasn’t gotten the bath thing down as yet but she’ll learn) is ready.

Chapter two covers things you can change without training such as the things I mentioned from chapter one. If you don’t have those already set for your parrot now is the time to fix it. I find that Birdtricks really focuses on the diet aspect of things and I do agree with them on that, a varied healthy diet with an organic based pellet is essential for optimal health for your parrot. They cover sleep, controlling your reaction, end all interactions on a positive note and learn to read body language. So Far I don’t disagree however they seem to stress on not letting the parrot be dominating, showing the parrot who is in charge and I’m sure they mean it in a nice way but that has rang a bell of warning for me. REMEMBER I BELIEVE IN EMPOWERING THE ANIMAL. So let’s see how this keeps going, I’m still keeping an open mind as they do talk about positive reinforcement being better than negative and I’m all for that!

Let’s move on as I know all these things about Grayson and the new IRN (Indian Ringneck) is pretty transparent as a baby right now. Chapter 3, they call it the most important step: Putting your bird on a training diet. They explain how to do it, why it works and to weigh your bird every day. I somewhat do this already although I don’t call it the training diet but I give them only enough food that they will eat in one sitting and I train before feeding them their main meal. You only need to do this if your reward for your parrot doing the right thing is a food reward, if not then implementing the training diet is not necessary. On my own note, if the rewards you are feeding is not in their regular diet then they should work for it whether or not they are on a training diet but I do understand you are NOT starving your parrot so what’s wrong with monitoring their intake? Also if you feed before their next meal you know they are almost getting to that hungry point where they start feeling peckish but their not fully hungry yet. It does help in the motivation process. You never want your parrot to be starving when training because let’s be real, I learn NOTHING when I’m hungry hahaha and I’m sure parrots are the same… Anyhow back to chapter 3. They end off chapter 3 with an introduction to my favorite bridge tool – The Clicker! They give you a clicker game to try on other humans to learn how to master using the clicker which I thought was a BRILLANT idea!! So yes Chapter 3 is on the same baseline as me, I am ready to move onto Chapter 4.

In Chapter 4, we actually learn more about using the clicker in your training. How to clicker train a bird that won’t take treats from your hand or one that is scared of your presence. As you know I’m a big advocate for the clicker, if you didn’t know please read my clicker training post ( which also has a YouTube video attached to it). It’s a very short chapter as it just focuses on getting your parrot to  know the clicker.

Chapter 5 is training the first behavior which is Target training, you have heard me talk about or seen me do YouTube videos showing this. So this is nothing new but I still did a 5 minute training with Grayson and the new IRN (Indian Ringneck) just to implement their first training session. Both of these birds are a pro at target training so this was easy and quick repetitions for them. You can read about my target training methods here.

They end off this book with a summary of things that you learned and why trick training is an important aspect to your bird’s life.

My Overall Thoughts: I would recommend getting this pamphlet for the first time bird owner or for a bird owner who is just starting to take an interest in training their parrots. I don’t know if it is available by itself as I got it in a package called “Basic Parrot Course: stop biting” which cost me $54.95USD. However if you know how to train your parrot and what’s needed in their development then this particular pamphlet may not be for you. I haven’t gotten through the rest of the course yet but will keep you posted.

I am just going through the package that they emailed me before anything else so the next one on the list I received is: How to Potty Train Your Parrot“. I truly don’t think it’s very important in the beginning of training your parrot however having a potty trained parrot saves you a lot of dirty clothes, dirty sheets, floor scrubbing etc. So look out for my review on that.

Please remember to click that follow button and join us on our journey via YouTube and Instagram. Thanks for your support!

 

Parenting Parrots!

To Clip or Not to Clip? That is the Question

Image

I will be completely honest, I blame clipping of my Galah Cockatoo’s wings to be the cause of her death(Will be a storytime on our Youtube channel). Overall, she felt incomplete as a bird and because she barely had learned how to fledge at that time, she never understood the importance of her wings hence her breaking them every time they grew in. A lot of people clip their birds’ wings and justify it for different reasons, I don’t argue with anyone. I listen and understand their point of view but you know what my thought on it comes down to?!? THEN DON’T GET A BIRD!!

A bird is meant to fly, are you still a bird if you can’t fly?? I think that makes them a chicken or a turkey or a rooster but definitely not a bird…. I will never tell someone they are wrong for clipping but is it not selfish to clip a bird because you can’t take the proper precautions to keep them safe? Wouldn’t it be better to leave them in the pet store or at the breeder’s house so someone who doesn’t have to risk their “winglyhood”, for safety can take them? I’ve heard about many accidents with parrots who have flown away or flew into a fan, etc :(. But couldn’t those have been prevented?  Such as making sure windows and doors aren’t opened when the bird is out or by turning off that fan? Maybe I just don’t understand as I’m not in those situations to have to make those type of decision but regardless let’s think about the bird.

To Clip

Internet Pic

Part of a bird’s anatomy is their wings just like humans, it’s their legs. Let’s say someone broke my legs and said no worries it will fix, it’s only temporary. In that time frame I’m paralyzed, I can’t move like I want to – I am at the beck and call of others. I have to rely on others as I can’t do for myself like I normally would, this is the same for clipped birds. Now some people may say nope! It’s not like that. Clipping wings is more like getting a haircut as it doesn’t hurt the bird and it will grow back. Yes that is all true however it is still temporarily paralyzing them from making the decision to flight or fight.

I have clipped birds but they are only clipped because they came to me that way so I patiently wait it out until their wings grow back in. I used to clip my parrots’ wings all by myself, I have also went to the vet to get it done. I never thought anything more about it until I started watching and observing my birds and realizing how BEAUTIFUL it was to see them spread their wings and fly. I love it! I haven’t clipped my African grey in 4 years and although he barely flies whenever he does, I feel like a proud mommy.

Wings

Internet pic

A lot of behavioral issues can arise from having a clipped parrot because of the lack of exercise. Flying is so important to parrots, it’s how they release all that built up energy so if you add flying plus foraging plus training and the perfect diet – YOU CAN ACQUIRE THE PERFECT PET! But without the flying aspect, what exercise can you give a parrot that would release the same amount of exercise that flying for 30 mins a day would help them release? One thing I used to do when Grayson’s wings were clipped is have him come out of the cage, I would hold on to his feet and tell him to flap his wings. He was great at it but it definitely was not releasing the same amount of energy that flying would have.

Once, I clipped Piper’s wings because people said it would make him easier to train and manage. Well let me tell you – I received a MONSTER from that. He went from never biting to always biting. He was miserable being clipped and now that he isn’t clipped anymore, he is back to his normal self. Yes, he flies from me but I understand that is his way of communicating to me to let me know he either had enough or is bored with what I’m doing etc….

There will always be pros and cons to clipping and not clipping your bird’s wings. It truly comes down to a personal preference. Do what’s best for you and for your parrot so you can both enjoy all that life has to offer.

 

DSC_0325

5 yr old Grayson

Please don’t forget to click that follow button!! Thanks for the support!

Parenting Parrots!

Can’t Have Just One!?!

Image

Why do you have so many birds? Why not sell them all and have just one?

Good questions and good points but why have more than one child? Why not tie your tubes after one? Is it fun being alone? Sometimes one is best and I wonder when I see people with one parrot how it would be if I had stopped at just Lola or just Grayson but then I feel the same way when I see people with one child. What if I never had any more children after my son? Why didn’t I just stop at one?

There are pros and cons to both sides. When you have one child/parrot you have more time to devote to that one child/parrot. You have more money to spend on that one child/parrot. Life is easier with one, it’s more manageable having that solo dependent but for me I yearned for more. I wondered about what would it be like if I had a girl or a different type of parrot… Did I have to have 6 more parrots on top of my one bringing my number to 7 – definitely not! But did I have to have 3 more kids on top of my one bringing my children to 4 – definitely not! I look at my parrots like my children, each one brings something different to the table. Yes, there comes a time when you have to say enough is enough and stop and I have finally gotten there. 7 is my lucky number, it’s God’s number.

Lorikeet and Monk Parakeet

Rasta and Piper

I have come into obstacles and had to make decisions to rehome parrots. Some parrots have come into my life and I realized this parrot isn’t for me but I do my best to find them a good home and 9 out of 10 times, I’m taking a pay lost to put them into a good family. I rather take a lost in price and feel secure about where I’m housing them then stick to my price and feel like I’m putting them in a bad situation.

Re-homing is never easy and I do talk about re-homing some birds in this article however I think the major problem is a lot of people don’t see their parrot as a part of their family. My parrots are a part of my family. Grayson is 5, Nyx is 4, Piper is 3, Ringo is 18 months, Rasta is 16 months and I added 2 more members to my flock who I haven’t told you about yet but if you are on my instagram then you would have already seen pictures of them.  I don’t have names yet hence why I haven’t posted information about them yet however one is 23 months old and the other is almost 16 weeks old this Sunday. This is my flock and I won’t be changing it unless I decide to get into breeding which is still up for debate.

Male Cockatiel

Chiko – was with me for 2 months before being re-homed to a good home where I still go and see him and Maro (the female pied cockatiel) every now and then

I did try to downsize my flock to 5 but for some reason, somehow my number always comes back to 7 so I’m calling defeat and staying at 7.

Each of my parrids (parrot kids) offer something different to the table, no 2 are alike and I love that! Piper is very independent but wants to make friends within the flock, Rasta is very hyper and likes to play fight but doesn’t like to be touched around his head, Ringo is very aloof and doesn’t want to engage with anyone unless he is being trained. Then we have Nyx who wants to always be with me and Grayson the most jealous bird of them all and is open to anything! They all talk and say different things and I just love watching a child/parrot grow, I love seeing their growth.

So to the question of why can’t I just have one? Because one was just not meant for me! I need and want the different personalities and learning styles around me. It keeps me on my toes and helps keep my mind stimulated. I’m constantly thinking of their learning styles and how to teach each one, kind of like a mini classroom hahaha. This is my family!

Parenting Parrots!

Grayson, The Grey…Chose Me!!

Image

WELCOME TO OUR NOVEMBER FEATURE OF THE MONTH – GRAYSON, THE GREY!!!!

When I first got Grayson, I was a newbie to the parrot world but I had done extensive research and knew I wanted a grey. Everyone told me, if you don’t work from home then do not get a grey. I got one anyways! (Can you say stubborn?)

Grayson chose me! I got to the breeder’s house with no clue about what to expect and there were 3 baby greys all playing around a cage. I wanted a female but they weren’t DNA tested yet so I had to wait for the results. I got first dips as I was the first customer. As I sat there, this beautiful grey kept coming over to me, kept interacting with me, I just couldn’t resist. I took notice of his band (a band is a ring of identification that they put around the bird’s feet) and told her I was very interested in that one. Their hatch dates were June 9, 11, 13, 2012. Their parents were Lady and Miata. Grayson I believe was born on June 11th or 13th, 2012 since I can’t remember we celebrate his birthday on June 12th.

DSCF0471

I contacted the breeder in the beginning of August and I went for my first visit on August 24th, 2012. She was very knowledgeable, she tested all her breeder birds for the 4 most common diseases and she was very concerned about the babies getting properly socialized. She discussed everything with me, from temperament to cage sizes to harness training. She was just a book full of information. My son and I spent a good amount of time there before we left.

In this batch, there was 1 girl and 2 boys. Grayson turned out to be a boy and I decided since he chose me, I’m going to take him. The day that I actually went to go pick him up he was growling at me. Now they say never take a growling bird so I became hesitant at that time but I said he chose me so regardless of why he is growling now, we’ll get through it and I took him home. I took him to the vet right away as to not void her health guarantee and he got everything checked (blood work and all) and he received a clean bill of health. I think back to that day and say if I had listened to what that book said, I would have missed out on a beautiful relationship. Follow certain advice but other times you might have to go against that advice and go with your instincts.

Grayson has been through a lot with me from losing other birds, bringing home new birds, having babies in the house, me never being home, etc… But he has never changed on me. No plucking or excessive screaming or phobia to new toys. The only issue I have is, I want him to become more social with others, so we’ve been working on it.

He has come a long way, he now lets my son step him up from his cage and train him even if I’m sitting right there so progress is being made, just got to make sure it remains consistent.

DSCF0469

If you can, let your parrot choose you….It’s not always possible but I can see the difference between the bond I have with parrots who chose me vs. ones who I just picked. Animals in general are good at sensing if they will mesh with you so better they choose.

Anyhow this was how Grayson, the grey came to live here!! Love you Grayson!!

Parenting Parrots!

DIY Foraging Toy

Image

I wish I could take all the credit here but I can’t. I stole this idea off of Facebook from Patricia Anderson who has a few Quakers and a Blue headed Pionus (They are perfectly trained and so gorgeous to look at). Anyhow I have always been one to believe in foraging as an important aspect for any parrot and recently I realized I spend a lot of money on toys – even more than I thought. Sometimes my toy bills (most of the time) are running me 2 to 300 dollars a shop. So I really wanted to find things I could make myself and wouldn’t break my pocket. So when Patricia posted the foraging cereal box I was all excited because being a family of 5 we go through cereal boxes as often as we change our underwear, hahaha daily.

DSC_0188.JPG

You see the red thing? It’s the Zip tie I used to attach this to the cage

I have a whole bunch of stuff I bought for foraging but if you are anything like me then you don’t have the creativity behind your belt to do it yourself so I have to steal ideas from others but that’s why they post them online right? To share? Once I get their basic ideas then sometimes ways to “fancy” it up comes to me… Only sometimes though.

So why do I find foraging to be important or why is it very high on my list? BECAUSE in the while food is not just handed to your parrot. They search for their food causing them to release energy and stimulate their brain cells. Now by no means does this mean starve them. I still use my food bowls but I do cover my food bowls with paper every now and then and have them rip through the paper to get to the food. I find the days I do that my house is quiet as a mouse because everyone is busy ripping through the paper for their pellets. Otherwise some mornings I’m crying about wanting more sleep. IT MAKES A DIFFERENCE! I/We can’t provide the wild environment for our parrots but we still need to find ways to keep them stimulated, motivated, entertained and I find that foraging toys do that….

It’s really simple, all I did (Now Patricia may have used different items inside of hers, I didn’t look into all of that) was take my cereal box put some timothy hay at the bottom, wrap up a few almonds into newspaper balls, put a few sheets of regular newspaper over, come nice crinkled purple (my favorite color) paper sticking out at the top and the inside was done. Then I pierced a few holes into a face and had treats sticking out. 2 Sunflower seeds for eyes, an almond for a nose and baby carrots going across to make a smile.

DSC_0190.JPG

I used a big cereal box but it was for my Indian Ringneck so I should have bought those cereals that are small that come in those packs of 10 and use that size. I think the big cereal boxes are too overwhelming for Ringo, that size is PERFECT for Grayson, my african grey.  So far Ringo hasn’t teared apart the box hence why I say the size is too big. But he has removed the carrots, almonds, sunflower seeds and some of the crinkled paper at the top…. Slowly but surely he is getting there.

Oh I attached it to the cage using a zip tie. My parrot shop sells them. I will be doing another one of these for Grayson and I think at the bottom of it I will make a small hole on each side and have a rope going from one end of the bottom to the next and tie a “Top toy” out of each side to make it more pretty with more accessories. I want to make lots of foraging toys and you can find GREAT ideas on Facebook DIY bird toy groups or by going on Pinterest or of course by following me! All you have to do is sign up where it says follow Parenting Parrots and you can go through this journey of toy making with me! I’ll post a YouTube video on making this toy next weekend and I’ll add it here but if you want to make sure you don’t miss that then go to my YouTube channel and Subscribe so you can see all the important videos we post there.

dsc_0189.jpg

Some people are visual learners vs. being a reader so that’s why I like to cover a video on what I write about here too.

Parenting Parrots!

Shhhhhh….. They need to sleep too!!

Image

Indian Ringneck sleeping – sorry I was trying to take these pictures discretely

So I forgot to write-up my post for you guys last night and I jumped up this morning thinking OH NO! Felt like I was late for a school assignment deadline lol. As usual I get up between 5am and 7am to use the washroom, this pregnancy has me going every 2 hours it feels like… Anyways every time I get up I have to be mindful of the sleeping creatures around me.

The kids and their reptile (although I just looked at him and he is wide awake) lol, The Rabbits and the birds. That’s A LOT of creatures to try to not wake up when making your way to the washroom in a small apartment. I find that the rabbits will sleep through noise as mine seem to be nocturnal or something, as they will be up with lots of energy at nighttime and sleep through the noise in the day. My parrots however are a different story. One little noise and they will be up looking. I can’t even turn on my light or else I know they will be up wanting to inquire about what is going on. Now, to avoid this issue most people cover their birds at night, it also apparently helps with them getting their full 12 hours sleep. I do not cover my parrots even though I wonder if I should. Their personalities seem fine. I don’t really have to encounter any grumpiness but what if they are missing out on 12 hours, could I be depriving their life span by maybe 5 years or something?

Black Capped Conure sleeping

The flash obviously woke her up

I’m not sure but definitely something to research and look into. All I know is every night/early morning I get up and walk on my tippy toes saying to myself, “Shhhhh….Do not wake the parrots, they need sleep too!” (Maybe I should get a tattoo like Rihanna saying Shhhhh)….I never thought that I would think of an animal with such respect before. If you knew me when I was little, you wouldn’t picture this to be my life now hahaha. I was a “chicken” of every living creature that could move, if it wasn’t human, I didn’t want anything to do with it.

It’s funny because I’m here talking about how they need at least 10 – 12 hours of sleep at night and how to have respect and be mindful of their needs BUT our they mindful of mine?? When I want to sleep until 12pm do you think they are sitting around saying, “Shhhh… She needs to sleep?” I’m living proof, that’s a NO! Some days they wake up so early, I’m putting the pillow over my head thinking why did I get birds? Am I crazy? Imma sell them all! Once I actually get up, all those negative thoughts disappear and I remember how much I love them. I could probably get more sleep if I covered them at nighttime so I have no one else to blame for the early morning wake up alarms but myself.

Quaker Parrot being disturbed while Sleeping

Sleeping Quaker, I think I woke him

They are actually convenient when you think about it…. As long as I have to get up after sunrise, I don’t need to set an alarm because I have a few personal alarm systems that will never fail. At least not as long as they are alive and well. Right now it is 7:55am and Ringo, my Indian Ringneck is the first one up. He isn’t actually making any noise however. He is playing with the foraging toy I made with the cereal box. That idea was inspired by Patricia Anderson. I absolutely LOVE HER! She has been such a strong mentor in my life even though it’s only been through social media. Any ways she posted her foraging idea on Facebook so I copied and I will be making one for every parrot! So convenient and cheap hahaha. After I post this, I’m planning to head back to bed, I want at least an hour’s more of rest. That might be wishful thinking though because I can see the early morning tint of blue shining through the curtains already which means it’s only going to be a matter of time before the birds start chirping.

The moral of this post hahaha just in case I didn’t make it clear is that Parrots need at least 10-12 hours of sleep in order to be able to function at their full potential so when you need to be up early just be mindful of…. “Shhhhh… They need sleep too”.

 

African Grey sitting on his food bowl when he should be sleeping
He never seems to sleep lol


Parenting Parrots!


Please don’t forget to hit that follow button so you can stay up to date with our crazy parrots’ world! Also Subscribe to us on YouTube and Instagram… The information can be found at the bottom of our About me page. Thanks for your love and support!

A month in the life with an African Grey

Image

I love my grey parrot.
DSC_0293

He is BY FAR NOT perfect! However, he is mine. I have had him since he was 4 months old and he has been through so much. Other pets, more kids, different jobs, lifestyle changes but one thing remains the same: My grey… Is always my grey.

Grayson is like any other grey who talks, dances (bops his head up and down to music), will show signs of aggression, doesn’t like to share, only cuddles when he wants to but I could never imagine my life without him in it. I couldn’t even imagine having a different grey because just like my kids he is forever my baby.

I’m focusing the month of November 2017 all to my grey – GRAYSON! (was suppose to be March) 

I hope you find these posts entertaining, educational and above all helpful!

The month of March has been hectic – I have only been home to sleep and have to be up and out again except on weekends. Grayson is my bird, he only responds to me and with the lack of attention he has been getting – I was afraid of the outcome however as always he has shown me that I need not worry.

I want to touch on this point for a minute, “The lack of attention”. Even with him not getting as much attention as he was used to, he has not started to pluck or anything negative. I can take him out and still train with him. Sometimes we can’t give them their required amount of time but as long as you give them some time and talk to them and still show love, I am a strong believer that this is what keeps the bond from being broken completely and helps to nourish his need for attention, therefore, stopping him from even thinking of self-mutation.

Anyhow, although I’ve had Grayson for years, I still do trust-building exercises with him and I urge you to do the same with your parrots. It doesn’t have to be every day but a few times during the month would be good. I tend to read a lot by his cage with the cage door closed and then open it when I am ready to be more physical with him. One game I always enjoyed playing with Grayson was peek-a-boo, so I do try to do that for a good 3 mins once a week.

I, unfortunately, do not trust Grayson to play with the kiddies but I will set up a section on the floor and have us all sit in a circle where the kids can roll the ball to him and have him fetch it and throw it back. I look forward to this time of ball playing because it is a bonding time for me with all my kids and Grayson.

To learn more about Grayson please check out his profile page.

Grayson’s month of March (November) has officially started lol.

Parenting Parrots

How to Clean with a Parrid (Parrot Kid)!

Image

Question: How can you include your parrot in your day-to-day activities?

I think this is a common inquiry by lots of parrot parents because they understand the need to interact with their parrot but not sure how to do it on a regular. Coming from a parrot parent that has multiple parrids (parrot kids), I can say it isn`t always easy. Some days my African Grey may have gotten more out of his cage time than one of the other birds or vice versa. However if people really started looking at parrots as their toddler, this task would be so much easier.

Today, I cleaned my washroom (pretty small) and decided to share with you how to clean with a parrid a.k.a parrot kid. What I do is gather all my supplies, a pocket full of treats, my clicker and a bird perch. I do this two different ways: clean each room with a different parrot or clean each section of one room with a different parrot. Today it was cleaning each section with a different parrot.

indian-ringneck-cleaning

Ringo

I started off with the tub and Ringo, our Indian Ringneck. Put him on the perch did a 5 minute training and started doing my tub. The perch is situated right outside the washroom door. I put on gloves and scrubbed down my tub while doing this I’m calling out and talking to Ringo the whole time. Once I’ve completed cleaning everything to do with the tub, I go back to another 5 minute training session with Ringo before putting him away to get another parrot to clean with. (I remove my gloves, wash and dry my hands before interacting with the parrot). If you clean with harsh chemicals than this method isn’t a good idea for you. If you know your cleaning with parrot safe items than doing this is a great way to incorporate your parrot into your cleaning.

quaker-parrot-is-inspector-gadget

Piper

Next, I took out Piper, our Quaker parrot. I did the same thing, train for 5 minutes and then clean the toilet. I trust Piper to not fly out of the blue so that is why I can trust him to clean the toilet with him however even with that I still leave the perch outside the washroom door. While I’m cleaning, I am still talking to the parrot the whole time so they are not just sitting there bored.When I am done, I do another 5 minute training session and put him back in his cage.

green-naped-lorikeet

Rasta

Then I brought out Rasta, our male green-naped lorikeet. He likes to perch on the shower rod so he gets a choice: either the perch or the shower rod. I usually train for 5 minutes, put him on the shower rod and then go to clean the washroom sink and sweep the floor. While doing this, I never forget to interact with Rasta via words. Once that is completed he gets another training session and back in his cage.

When I mop the floor, I do not have any parrots out as I leave the mop bucket without supervision and do not want any accidents. Also parrots can still do things out of character and sometimes their behavior is not always predictable so I don’t want to take any chances.

Hopefully this gives you an idea of how to clean an area with your parrots. Cleaning the house or a certain room has to be done, so why not make it fun!?! I enjoy cleaning with the presence of my parrots because I get to have one on one time while doing housework.

lorikeet-approved

Rasta Approved!!

If I was doing a full day of cleaning then having one parrot out for cleaning the washroom would work but I would have to take slight breaks to do a bit of physical interaction with the parrot. Sometimes I even stop halfway to remove them from that perch to a play stand or the wood tree etc… The possibilities are endless. Just make sure you are keeping your parrot entertained while cleaning or else it won’t look forward to the time spent with you and that would defeat the whole purpose. Every interaction with your parrid (parrot kids) needs to be a fun one!

Parenting Parrots!

How to Solve your Parrot’s Behavior Problem!

Image

Good Bird, a guide to solving behavioral problems in companion parrots by Barbara Heidenreich is a wonderful book to have in your collection. Whether or not you have a parrot with behavioral problems doesn’t matter because this book gives you the knowledge to understand why the behavior may happen and solutions to solve it. By reading this book, you can start to know the signs and see if a problem may be arising before it actually arrives.

goodbird

Barbara Heidenreich has actually been in our shoes, she is a parrot owner. Who else to learn from if not one of our very own. She has also been a parrot trainer and have helped many families with behavioral issues in parrots.

So how do you solve your Parrot’s behavior issues? Simple! POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT! Barbara tells us this in the very 1st chapter, the introduction. If you have no idea what I am talking about, I explain all about training in my post called “What time is it??“.

goodbarbarabird

But before you start implementing positive reinforcement, there are a few things you must first learn about: Body language! The first communication you will always have with a companion parrot is body language. Learn how to read it and what certain signs mean and you will be able to connect with your parrot better. In this book, Barbara explains their body language and gives you some insight in how to read them and what it means. What I love in this section is that she does her best to include pictures of birds that are displaying the body language she is describing.

She dedicates a chapter to each behavior issue you may come encounter with so you can either read the whole book (which I recommend) or you can just jump to the chapter that you may need help with. Her chapters go like this: Introduction – Chapter 1: Preparing the Companion Parrot Owner – Chapter 2: Screaming – Chapter 3: Biting – Chapter 4: Bonding to one person – Chapter 5: Cage Bound Bird – Chapter 6: Feather Picking and her closing chapter her Final Thoughts. Each chapter is filled with possible scenarios, why it may be happening, what you can do and a detailed explanation. I read this book about once every two years just to refresh my mind.

barbara

I can confidently say that I do not have to worry about any screaming issues. For her biting chapter, now that I have Marlee, the lorikeet and she tends to nip, I will be practicing this chapter and hopefully by the new year, I will be completely bite-free! Next is the bonding to one person – This refers to my African Grey, he is completely bonded to me however when I am not around he will go to others – Barbara’s methods do work! I haven’t been able to test her cage bound theory or her feather picking theory as none of my parrots have  any of these issues  but I’m sure it works also.

You can follow her blog and check out her stuff at http://www.goodbirdinc.com/. She offers e-books, dvds, books, blog posts and seminars. I haven’t had a chance to check out her stuff as yet but I do give this book a 5 star rating as it’s an easy read with pictures and very straight to the point. From front to back it is a total of 81 pages. Really can’t go wrong.

the-back

Parenting Parrots!