Parrot Cage Bedding/Lining

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One thing about having birds is cleaning up after them. How does one choose the best bedding for your parrots’ home? For me it’s all about the easiest to clean up and the cheapest for my pocket but yet the safest for my little friends. So there are quite a bit of options:

Corncob:
I personally have never used the stuff but it’s a bedding I’ve actually heard about quite often. Not because it’s any good but because it can kill your parrot. As a matter of fact, I believe it was this bedding that was put into the famous African Grey, Alex’s cage which got him sick and unfortunately ended his life. I could be wrong but it was a corn something that shouldn’t have been used. Corncob is deadly if ingested as it absorbs moisture. So please don’t use it.

Nothing:
Yes, this is an option if you know for a fact that you will be washing the tray down everyday.

Doggy Pee Pads:
I used to use these but then I heard there were chemicals in it that weren’t safe for the birds and since I couldn’t guarantee that my birds would never come in contact with it, I stopped using them.

Betta Chips:
Can be scooped like kitty litter and won’t fly around like shavings. I have never tried this but definitely something I will consider.

Paper:
I believe this is your best option, as it’s safe, cheap and it’s easy to clean. Plain newspaper, paper towels, moving paper (can be bought from a moving company like U-haul).

Cardboard:
This was just recently suggested to me off of my youtube video on this topic by a subscriber named budgieyy. This individual said they cut a cardboard the same size as the tray, cover it with plastic and tape it with packing tape. That way s/he picks up the cardboard, dusts it off and places it back into the cage tray. This has definitely got my attention, I do believe I will be trying this!

For more options, please watch the below video:

Parenting Parrots

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My 2nd Attempt at Parrot Ownership

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After my scare with the gray cockatiel named Sky, I was certain birds were not for me. However, I was drawn back to parrot ownership a few years later and decided this time I was going to an actual pet store to purchase a bird. There, I fell in love with a Senegal parrot who we named Chico. He was just a baby at PJ Pets in Sherway Gardens Mall and I was certain he would be mine. I was torn between him and a baby Congo African Grey so I purchased both of them from PJ Pets and was content with my decision. They were both babies so I had to wait for them to be weaned before I could take them home.

Chico was ready to go home before the African Grey so we took him home first. Within a week of having Chico, he could say “JayJay (my son’s name)” and “Chico“. I was so IMPRESSED! Every morning I would get up and take Chico out of his cage and let him hang out on a stand at the bottom of my bed as my son and I would cuddle back to sleep. Chico would come on the bed, walk up to my son and say “JayJay”. It was GREAT for all of us and we were enjoying the time so much but our happiness wouldn’t last. Before the first week was done, my intuition kicked in that something may be wrong with Chico. I was new to parrot ownership but I had read and researched so much, I just felt that things weren’t normal.

Chico was losing his tail feathers. Why? I called the store and they told me Chico was most likely molting and it was nothing to be worried about. My response was, molting at 3 months? That doesn’t seem right. I spoke to the manager and made a deal that I would bring Chico in to be seen by their vet and if nothing was wrong with him, I would pay the vet bill. That was the last time we ever seen Chico.

Chico had a liver problem so they refused to sell him to me. I told them, I was okay with them prescribing medication and letting me take him after he was better. There was no getting better for Chico it was just a countdown. I was devastated. We missed Chico and I didn’t know what to do next. I returned his cage and never got another Senegal again.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I would love a Senegal but I just don’t want to take away from Chico’s memory. So instead of a Senegal, we got the next best thing… A BROWN HEADED PARROT!!

Parenting Parrots

Lorikeet Love

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Out of all my birds, the Lories/lorikeets are by far my favorite. They are very energetic and keep me on my toes however they also make me worry a lot. I’m always wondering if they are healthy, if I left the nectar too long, if I’ve given them enough fruits, etc… The list of worry goes on and on. Through all those worried thoughts are smiles, laughters and sometimes tears.

Building a relationship with Kodak, our Black lory was by far the hardest thing I had to do. He would screech, lung to bite me and I was ABSOLUTELY TERRIFIED of his bite. All I remember thinking is maybe I met my match, he is the bird that’s going to show me I suck at bird ownership. He is going to be my “fearful” bird. Kodak is quite the opposite. I kept trying to teach him to step up, turn around, station and I thought this parrot is just not getting it and I was losing my patience until one day it just happened. He stepped up and our bond has just blossomed ever since.

Rasta, Green-naped Lorikeet

Rasta went from being a bird that didn’t really care for us to being almost caught up to Grayson, our African Grey’s training level.  He has impressed me beyond words. His vocabulary is strong and clear. He is energetic and enthusiastic about training and interacting but yet he also wants to have things under his control. Rasta went from not interacting with my son to only wanting to interact with him. An absolute 360 degree turn around but one that I welcomed and encouraged. Rasta is the only bird in the house that prefers my son but I’m happy about it because my son now considers Rasta to be his. They do a lot together, play around in the bed, watch tv, play video games even when my son is doing homework Rasta is right by his side. My son can get Rasta to step up from anywhere. For me? Not so much.

I absolutely have nothing bad to say about Lories/Lorikeets. I haven’t met one that I didn’t adore. I would be happy with a houseful of Lories but I can imagine it would get quite noisy and I have enough noise to last me a lifetime hahaha. With all that being said though, they definitely aren’t for everybody especially the green-napes. I have heard so many complaints about them, it saddens my heart because it really comes down to patience and understandings. I’ve had people offer to surrender their green-napes to me and I’ve had to turn them down as I just don’t have the living space unfortunately. These guys can be very nippy and very demanding if you are a passive individual so you need to know the type of person you are before getting one.

Parenting Parrots

Taming a Breeding Pair

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I decided I’m not breeding birds anymore because I just found it too hard to say bye to the baby. So I gave up all my breeding pairs except for the Indian Ringnecks as I never actually paired them and the blue parrotlets because I find them just too cute! Today as I sat here, I decided it’s time for me to start taming and training these little blue birdies because I want their time here to be enjoyable and not just stay in a cage watching the other birds get love and attention while they get nothing…

Will I breed them? I still haven’t decided if eventually I might have to because they already had a clutch. I will let them decide what they want to do. I’m extremely excited about this journey because a lot of people say birds that have matured and have never been handled and are paired will never be tamed and friendly. We’ll see. I welcome the challenge.

My goal is to have all the birds that live with me to live a fulfilling, successful, full potential life. I feel like I’m far from that goal at the moment

but after listening to the audiobook of Irene Pepperberg’s “Alex and Me”, it gave me anew hope. I hope you will follow our Journey on this. I will post here every Tuesday – “Training Tuesday with Parrotlets” and every Tuesday my weekly work with them will be posted on our Youtube Channel.

My first goal is to eliminate their scare. They are completely afraid of humans even being near their cage. I moved their cage to my bedroom. I find the intimacy of a bird being in my room seems to make birds feel more at home or comfortable I guess because your in a relaxing setting of your house which they can sense (not sure). But anytime I feel I need more time with a parrot, this is what I do and it seems to make us have a stronger connection. Next step will be clicker training, target training and having them eat from my hand and of course the final beginning stage will be having them step up to me. They are both fully flighted. I have named them Bonnie and Clyde (not that they know their names but hopefully they will soon learn them.) I will be moving them back and forth between their cage and the aluminum travel cage I have just to get them out of the habit of “this is our territory”.

I’m not a professional this is just me thinking out my ass and trying to figure things out as I go along but I’m so hopeful and the task gives me a real “purpose”. Sometimes I feel my life lacks purpose. Maybe this is why I have so many parrots because my interactions with them fill me up ( I don’t know) but I’m so excited. I can’t contain myself. Today I’m transferring them to the aluminum travel cage so I can clean their cage completely out. I was also thinking of keeping them side by side but separating them during the day and putting them back together during the night as it might make it easier to connect with each one but I won’t jump the gun I will try it with both of them first and make a decision from there. Anyhow please like, comment and join our family of followers! Also subscribe to our Youtube channel! Can’t promise I will make a difference in your life but you never know what you might learn or ideas you might get along the way.

  Parenting Parrots

My African Grey is Selfish

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It breaks my heart to see Rasta, our Green-Naped Lorikeet trying to make friends with everyone and being turned away. He is such a nice, little guy I don’t understand why none of the birds play with him.

He has found a way to “bond” with Grayson or at least so he thinks. Rasta will fly to Grayson’s cage and preen Grayson through the cage bars but if I let Grayson out with Rasta, Grayson will attack.
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It’s like Grayson is only using Rasta for his own gain. Poor Rasta, really thinks he has made a friend.

Why is Grayson so selfish? He won’t return the favor so why keep getting the pleasure? When I first got Grayson, Lola was here but yet he still hasn’t learned about sharing. He was never an “only” parrot, so why?

Grayson

The Selfish Grey

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How can I teach a parrot about sharing? If you have any ideas or suggestions please leave them in the comments below.

Parenting Parrots

The Arrival of the Brown Headed Parrot

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I did not want a brown headed parrot. As a matter of fact, I was totally against bringing one home. I contacted the breeder for a blue headed Pionus and although she had a pair on eggs, she kept talking to me and sending me pictures of her brown heads. I first made contact with her in February when she told me, she doesn’t put the breeding boxes up at this time of year. I waited and messaged her again in June stating I found another breeder but I think they want too much for their blue heads and I really wanted one of her babies. We started speaking from there.

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My little man is the smallest one that’s in the middle

She just kept sending me pictures of the growth of her brown heads and forgot to inform me of the Blue heads not hatching. Finally, I said that’s all great for your Poicephalus but what about the Pionus’. That’s when she informed they didn’t hatch. We continued to talk about the brown heads but I informed her I wasn’t interested so she found other homes for her babies. She added me to her Facebook group where I meant other poicephalus and pionus owners. I fell in love with the pictures and videos people would post of their Poicephalus. The weird thing is, I’m used to seeing all sorts of cuteness when it comes to parrots but brown heads was something special.

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This picture did me in! A female from facebook owns this little beauty

I contacted her personally and was like I changed my mind, I fell in love, can I have one, please tell me you still have one left. She kept asking me why, what changed your mind, etc, etc…. In my head I was saying IF she still had one it was a sign but if not I wouldn’t pursue getting one. Well, if you follow our YouTube Page, you would know that for the past month our house has been shared with a little baby poicephalus.

A Brown head is so different than my other parrots. I feel like I have so much to learn but our little Brown Head is here. He was hatched on June 3rd, 2018 and we named him Pookie. I will be updating our flock page and going into more details about him shortly.

Don’t forget to follow us on here to keep updated, I’m back to posting 5 days a week. Also our YouTube channel is updated 5 days a week so you should subscribe to us there and follow our instagram!!

Parenting Parrots

The Flying Parrot

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I do not believe in clipping wings anymore. I used to do it more out of convenience for me than for any other concern so I haven’t clipped wings in a long time. I love seeing my birds open their wings and take off!

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I truly am disappointed to live in Canada because I see those birds in Australia having such a delightful time and I wish my birds could do that. If I trained them to live outside especially during the winter than that dream could become a reality but facts are they would have to be born in those conditions and kept in those conditions in order to be able to handle it. I do not want to wake up one day to see that my parrot froze to death so that idea is a BIG No, no!

I see my birds fly indoors, within my little apartment and it keeps me in “awe” to watch the natural beauty of the flying parrot. Today the weather was beautiful and all I could think of is how would it be to be able to see my birdies fly outdoors. This brings me back to harness training. In order to get a bird on a harness, it has to trust you and love you and let you do things a regular bird that didn’t know you, wouldn’t let you do. If Nyx was here, she would be that bird for me. But she’s not and I have to accept that. Maybe this was a blessing in disguise because I always turned to her to do stuff like that instead of any of the other parrots so now I will work on getting them all more trusting of me and therefore building on our relationship more.

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From arcticwingsfreeflightclub.com

Having a free-flighted parrot would have been AMAZING! Although I would always be afraid of it flying off somewhere but the training guarantees that, that won’t happen if the bond is there. What I was saying before was if their body was conditioned to the cold then I could teach them free flight but since it’s not and I don’t plan on trying to get them used to the cold, the option is out for me. You may be asking why? Why not let them be free-flighted during the spring and summer and just have them indoors not flying during the colder months? Well, that was my thought exactly but I was made aware that once you start free flying them you have to keep it up or else you will cause a whole lot of issues such as plucking and screaming etc.

Free-flying parrots don’t have the issues, that parrots who are locked up in a cage, have. But unfortunately, not all of our lives allow for that option so we have to do the best we can. Harness train them so they get outside time free of a travel cage and they can stretch their wings and exercise. It’s not exactly the same but it is the closest option. However, getting a parrot to put on a harness willingly, isn’t such an easy task but it is doable so follow our Youtube channel to eventually see a video on how to properly harness train your parrot. I’m hoping to have it up by the end of June! I will still have my flying parrot outside just not freely.

The latest in Aviator Harness Fashion model by Zoey

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Parenting Parrots

Purrain – The Indian Ringneck Parakeet

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I purchased Purrain from a breeder in Ajax when she was 2 months old (Sept. 2017). I found this breeder on the Facebook Canadian breeder site. He posted a picture of her and I jumped up right away saying I want her. I didn’t have all the money so I had to do a payment plan and then I had a death in the family which pushed things even further back. I didn’t end up getting her until she was 14 weeks old (Oct. 2017)

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baby Purrain, 8 weeks

Name: Purrain

Type of Parrot: Single factor Violet Indian Ringneck

Sex: female

Birth Date: July 2017

Wings Status: Will be fully flighted, her wings were slightly clipped when we got her but they are growing in.

Favorite food: Pine Nuts

Noise Level: she can be loud when she wants attention. Otherwise I would say she is moderate when making sounds.

Training progress: She loves training sessions

Tricks: She is target trained. She can step up and turn around

Talking ability: Haven’t heard her talk yet

Favorite toys: She tackles every toy I put in her cage.

Fears: She is afraid of sudden movements

Diet: Harrison’s Pellets with fruits and veggies. She eats table food – Chicken, rice, pasta…

Treats: Safflower seeds, Pine nuts and sunflower seeds

Cage Size: Playtop. 22 x 24

Last Vet visit: I haven’t taken her yet. i know 😦 bad mommy

Next Steps: Getting her to let me put her on her back and  harness training.

 

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Purrain, about 5 months

 

Parenting Parrots!

 

Want a Parrot? Probably NOT!

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Parrots are the perfect pet! NOT! For me, they are but I constantly have to remind myself that not everyone is like me…. So let’s discuss their cons:

challenging
misunderstood
messy
aggressive
biting can happen
noisy
Intelligent
time and patience is needed

African Grey

Messy Parrot

Let’s be real at least one item on this list does not match with your personality but yet you want one anyway… Why would we do this to ourselves?

Is it for the “WOW” factor – “OMG you have a parrot?!? That’s so cool!”
Is it for the fancy color patterns that are so often seen in the Macaws?
Is it for the challenge of proving to ourselves that we can do it?

Green Naped Lorikeet

Must Touch Everything

Why? Why take on more work? As if you don’t already have to deal with the horrible boss at your 9 – 5. Or the annoying, nosy neighbor that always wants to borrow sugar. Or the kids who don’t listen. Or what about your own cleaning? As if you don’t make enough mess in your own household that you are constantly cleaning that you want to add more work for yourself? Why?

To be honest, I don’t even know if I have the answer. Parrots are A LOT of work, some days I don’t want to deal/interact with them especially if I’m down but on other days I couldn’t imagine my life with just one. They fill a void in my life, I’m not quite sure what the void is but something about being around parrots makes me happy.  It’s like being around my kids, when they aren’t  driving me up the wall, they make me smile and so happy to have them around me but I still worry about them same as with my parrids.

Quaker Parrot

Hi

So if you are thinking of getting a parrot, great choice! Just make sure you are ready for that lifelong commitment. Understand that they go through stages just like humans. They are a very hands on pet, cage bound is NOT the way to go with them and they talk back and you don’t always like what you hear hahaha. Sometimes I wonder how my life would be without them – Peaceful, I would have more money, more me time, less cleaning, more travelling, less education hahaha. Oh man the list can go on and on but one thing stops me – I would miss my companions too much. I love when my house is clean, their cages are clean and I can spend some actual quality time with each and every one but still think twice about a parrot purchase because that quality time could have been “me” time or going out time etc…

So you think you want a parrot? hmm.. PROBABLY NOT! If you consider all the work you have to put into a parrot to keep them well-trained/well-tamed. However in that same breath, if all the above doesn’t scare you then maybe you are ready to move further along in your process of obtaining a feathered toddler.

Unpredictable

I think he wants to bite my tongue off lol

Parenting Parrots

Scaredy Cats

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I have to dedicate this post to my beloved older sister of 7 years and her wonderful 18-year-old daughter, who you can follow on YouTube @KiCassanova. They come here like once a month but when they do, they make me laugh so hard because they are absolutely terrified of the parrots. Why? I don’t know. I keep the parrots in their cages when they come over even though I feel so bad because the parrots love their time out of their “mini” homes. Anyhow these two freak out over anything!

For example today, I took Grayson, my 5 yr old African Grey out of his cage and he decided to flap his wings! Such a beautiful site to  see however apparently these  two didn’t think so. They covered their heads and screamed, so scared that he was going to  fly. It’s funny but the poor Grey bird doesn’t understand why these two humans are making such obnoxious noises. So what do you do when you have guests over who are scared of your birds?

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On one hand, I don’t want to terrify my visitors anymore than they already are by having the parrots out but I don’t want the parrots to feel like they have to be confided to their “homes” because of the strangers who are over.

On the other hand, I want my parrots to be socialized to people but how can I get in any proper interactions if the visitors are scaredy cats because that could be a foundation of danger and my birdies will become afraid of all strangers if anything goes wrong.

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3 yr old feeding treats to an Indian Ringneck

We always say “Prevention is better than Cure” so I rather prevent a negative experience from happening vs. having to try to fix the issue after the fact. I’m stuck, as I don’t know how to help people overcome their fear of birds so therefore I have no way of making a positive interaction occur. The only thing  I can think of is to lead by example but I’m sure their response will be, “Well they are like that with you because they are yours.” So I feel like I’m in a no win situation.

Scaredy Cats can be very entertaining but what damage could they be causing to your little feathered friends by their reaction? Will my parrots ever trust these noisy creatures or has permanent damage been done by the multiple times they have seen these humans act a fool over nothing?  Certain times we are oblivious to the fact that these little encounters may have an everlasting affect on your parrids. Moral of my story is the next time you have a “scaredy cat” over be more in tune to your parrots’ body language so you can see exactly how the interaction is affecting them.

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Parenting Parrots