Monthly Parrot Cleaning Schedule

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Do you have a cleaning schedule? I just felt like my life was spiraling out of control and everything was getting half done and half not done. So recently, I started a cleaning schedule, along with my family schedule and eating/sprouting schedule. So many schedules but with 4 kids another on the way, a job, blogging, YouTube, 8 parrots, 5 axolotls and a bearded dragon it just seemed necessary. So it’s only been 2 months in the making but these two months have been the most peaceful that my life has felt in the last 5 years, hahaha.

So I personally don’t like to read long blogs and I have a few of them up here hahaha (some topics just need more time unfortunately). I decided to break my cleaning schedule up for you guys and not have it all in one. I hope this helps some people with cleaning up after their parrots and if you have any suggestions for me please let me know.

So my monthly clean is done once a month on the first Saturday of the month. May 2019 will be my 3rd month trying this and so far I feel very content with how its all coming together and I have more time to spend with my beauties.

Kodak, Black lory and Rasta, Green Naped Lorikeet

My monthly routine I believe is pretty standard, I also have a daily routine and a weekly routine which I will share with you, so that really helps my monthly routine.

  • Wash your parrot’s entire cage thoroughly – This can be done via hand washing with a bucket of Dawn dish washing liquid and a cloth. You can also put it in your shower if it is small enough or bring it outside and power wash it. Whichever works best for you is the one you should implement once a month.
  • Vacuum your walls. You will be surprised at how much dust and dander resides there.
  • Laundry your curtains. This is only if your parrots go on your curtains otherwise you can just vacuum them because dust and dander will gather there too. My birds love sitting on the top of my curtains as it’s the highest perch in my apartment so washing my curtains is a must for me.
  • Vacuum your air filter. I assume all bird owners own one of these, without it I would be LOST! HAHAHA. Vacuuming your filter, I find helps it work more better and obviously clears it up to pick up more dander.

That is it for my monthly schedule. Look forward to my daily and weekly schedule to be posted shortly. Thank you so much for your time and please don’t forget to like and comment.

Parenting Parrots

Parrot Ownership is a Lifestyle Change

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It sucks that a lot of people end up getting a parrot just because they are cute and they are not aware of the fact that having a parrot is a lifestyle change. Store owners just want to sell the bird so they tell you they are easy, just give them pellets and water and change the paper at the bottom of the cage once a week. HAHAHA, if this was true, we wouldn’t have so many re-homes. I would have 20 instead of 8 birds and I would be rich because I wouldn’t be spending money on toys, perches, food, sprouts, feeding equipment, air filters, cages, vet bills, travel carriers, training tools, seeds and nuts for training, cleaning products, paper towels and I’m sure I’m missing a few other things.

I’ve had to adjust my life SO much to accommodate my parrots and I still am everyday. I went from working full 10 hour shifts to only 6 hours so I can have more time with the birds. I changed my non-stick cookware to stainless steel pots (very costly switch). I had to remove all air fresheners from my house and find homemade, safe options. All cleaning solutions have been removed so nothing remains except bleach, vinegar, dawn dishwashing liquid and good old water options and some bird cleaning products. I buy LOTS of paper towels and have to stop my “night owl” tendencies to make sure I’m being sensitive to their 10-12 hour night rest. I have to get up earlier in the morning to make sure I feed and change their water bowls/bottles before I go to work. So now that I have to be at work for 7am and I have to leave home by 6:30am to make it on time. I usually wake up at 5am so I can have an extra 30 minutes to accommodate them. I usually like to train before breakfast but unfortunately I just can’t find the extra time to do that in the mornings now except for on weekends. So I now train before lunch or before dinner depending on how much they ate from breakfast.

I have to consider how long I’m going to be out of the house if I’m leaving to go somewhere. I haven’t had a vacation since acquiring my birds because I haven’t lined up a sitter and I’m still concerned about leaving them with others to care for them (worried mommy). Your life will never be the same. Having parrots is a lifestyle change. I used to work from home answering the phones hahaha I can’t do that with parrots in the house, they are just too unpredictable regarding when they will decide to vocalize. I have to retreat from my living room at a certain time so they can get to bed on time. EVERYTHING and ANYTHING I do includes how it will affect my birds. They are just like having kids. I should know I have quite a bit of both hahaha.

This type of change is NOT for everyone, definitely think twice before deciding if you truly want a bird. No more using the oven self-cleaning option for an easy clean, no more sleeping in or being lazy, DEFINITELY more cleaning and then more education. My learning NEVER stops when it comes to having parrots and if you are seeking the best for your birds, yours won’t stop either. So just think about all these things BEFORE you add a bird to your life. Are you ready for a lifestyle change?

If so please comment below with what birds you have decided to make this change for example an African Grey parrot, Amazon, Macaw, Cockatoo? Which bird has captured your heart and what other type of lifestyle changes did you have to make that maybe I forgot to mention?

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Parenting Parrots

Making Food Fun!

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Frozen Food

There is something about watching parrots work for things that personally warms my heart. So I’m always looking for ways to enrich their lives. Parenting Parrots has so many things going on, I can barely find the time to inform you guys of everything but I will try to be more consistent. If we think about the parrots in the wild, what do we know about them? We know that food isn’t just given to them freely, we know that they spend a great deal amount of time foraging for food while making and protecting babies. Now, as much as I would love to mimic the wild environment, I unfortunately can’t BUT what I can do is try to come as close as possible to making them be fully stimulated, enriched and engaged.

The above picture is something that I can give to all my parrots including the Lories. I took little containers, filled them up with fruit. You can use whatever type you like. For this mix I used raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, mangoes and some cashews and almonds (I eliminated the cashews and almonds for the lories). Once I finished putting the food in, I filled it up with coconut water and put them in the freezer. So the next morning, I took them out, removed them from their containers and gave one to each parrot. Since it was frozen the birds got to lick and suck on the cold coconut water and while it defrosted right there, they got access to the food bits. It wasn’t a lot of work but at the same time it made it interesting and engaging for the birds especially since they kept at it for a while before realizing it needed more time to defrost.

Frozen Cube

This was a tasty little treat and definitely a way to make food more fun and get your parrots that are picky to start trying. I can’t guarantee that they will still eat whatever they are refusing but always introducing items in different ways can get a bird interested in a food item that they previously neglected. Making this cube was quick and easy, less than 5 minutes to prepare and put together. I will offer more cubes like this, more often during the summer months.

Fruit Cube

You could also substitute the coconut water for whatever type of liquid you like, the options are endless. I hope you will try this and please leave me a comment down below and let me know how your birds liked it. Also if you are going to give this to your lories/lorikeets please remove the nuts. I will be making this again, if you would like a YouTube video on it, please let me know so I can do that for you.

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Thank you for everything! I hope together we can enrich out fids’ lives.

Parenting Parrots

Dear Lola,

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If words could express my disappointment in losing you, they would fill up the world. I never knew a person could feel such a deep lost for a companion animal until the night I laid with you in my arms, begging you to live but knowing you were taking your last breath. I still consider that day to be the worst day of my life because I failed you. Lola, I could never know what happened with that vet clipping your wings but you definitely set me on the path to realize how important wings are to a parrot especially if that parrot is already a timid parrot. Although that clip was against my will, I regret using that vet because another may have listened to my demands of no and you would still be here with me. I’m sorry and I hope you are happy wherever you may be and realize that I loved you as if I had given birth to you myself.

Lola, was my Galah Cockatoo. I consider her to truly be my first introduction to the parrot community and I bought her with no knowledge of what it meant to be a parrot owner. Just knew I liked how she looked and I wanted a bird. I don’t regret having Lola, I just wonder if she would have been better off with someone else. Would she have lived longer? Been happier? OR was she destined to be with me, who would fail her in the end? When I got Lola I drove 4 hours to pick her up and 4 hours to bring her back. When we met she stepped up to me with no problem and had no hesitation even the breeder said we were meant to be. Lola spent most of her days out of her cage and with me wherever I went. She was kept in a very tiny cage at the breeder so I suspect she didn’t truly get a chance to learn how to fledged as she never flew. I would see her open her wings and flap but she never took off. I started doing research on parrots and came across Birdtricks.com, they were my first introduction to parrot training and taming. I immediately bought their dvds and went to work. Before her first vet visit which would change her forever she had already learned how to step up perfectly, wave and turn around.

I didn’t want to bring her to a vet for fear she may catch something so I had the vet come to me. This vet ignored my wishes for a fully flighted parrot. Proceeded to tell me, it was better to clip her wings as she would be more manageable and it was a safer option but I wasn’t having any problems with training Lola so I still said no thank you. She asked me for a towel and I went and got it, by the time I got back, the damage was done. She had clipped one wing already so I had no choice but to continue with the procedure. Then she trimmed Lola’s nails so short, my poor Lola no longer was able to grip her perches. So with no nails and no wings to help her balance as soon as they put Lola back in the cage, she fell straight to the bottom. I was devastated. The vet told me to put pillows and towels at the bottom and that she would stop after a day or two. I did what I was told but I wasn’t happy. All of Lola’s bloodwork came back perfect. But Lola no longer wanted to come out of her cage, she didn’t want to train, she didn’t want to be interacted with and the worst part is she never let her wings grow back.

Lola was my first bird. A Galah Cockatoo. She was suppose to be so full of life and she was until she seen the vet. I tried everything I could think of and nothing worked. I finally brought her to another vet to see if they could help. Re-did bloodwork, looked her over and was told absolutely nothing was wrong with her. She wasn’t plucking but she would damage her wings as soon as they grow back in. I started treating her like a plucker and I would give her toys that were for pluckers, hoping she would ignore her wings, bathed her with water mixed with aloe vera to try and help if she was experiencing any itches from the wings growing in. I even bought her a mop head that I would put on top of her cage to help distract her. Nothing worked. The new vet advised me that it must be psychological but had no other suggestions for me. I was lost, hurt and confused. I considered re-homing her wondering if a new environment would help but could never go through with it as I was too attached. I contacted an animal psychic in hopes that she would be able to communicate with Lola and get to the bottom of the issue once and for all. That psychic either was fake or for some reason just couldn’t connect to my birds.

Lola would live for 3 years with us. It was me, my son, Lola and Grayson, our African Grey. She didn’t come out to play or interact with anyone. I left her cage door open 24/7 and she remained inside. The day that Lola passed, we had left the house and came home to find her on the floor of my living room, looking like she was having a seizure, bright green poop coming out of her. I fixed up the travel carrier with towels and stuff to make it warm and comfortable for her. I brought her in my room and monitored her activity. She was dying and I knew it. All vets were closed so I called on the same vet, I blamed for Lola’s behavior but even she was unavailable to help. I couldn’t go to the emergency vet as I had just had a baby girl, wasn’t fully healed and had no access to the car at that time. Lola would live to the wee hours of the morning and pass on the blanket.

My lack of parrot ownership and trust in a vet, took my Lola from me. Since then I have been adding to my flock in order to help more birds to try and make up for the guilt I felt losing Lola. I have since lost 2 more birds unfortunately and although I know they weren’t as bad as Lola, I can’t help but continue to strive for a better tomorrow for the companion birds that are still alive.

Each parrot I lose has taught me something new. Lola taught me that birds need to learn to fledged and are better off being fully flighted so now all my parrots are. Piper taught me that I need to remove fresh foods as soon as possible and keep the cages spic and span in order to avoid pesticides from infecting the parrots. Nyx taught me to demand bloodwork from vets be done because she was sick from before she was rehomed to me and we should have realized that by how quick her beak would grow but again a vet denied my request stating that conures just didn’t take good care of their beaks. I’m glad to have known each and every one of these birds and although I miss them dearly they have made me a better me, a better parrot owner, a better companion to my parrots.

Lola, you will forever be in my heart and I hope I can continue to make you proud.

Parenting Parrots