Home Alone

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Would you leave a two-year old child home alone? I would hope not! So if I say parenting a parrot is like having a toddler than how does that work when you have to leave the house and can’t take your precious birdie with you? GOOD QUESTION!

Some people like the idea of training their parrot to be “home – trained” so it can be out and about in the house all alone and therefore they  won’t need a cage.  This is my own opinion but I think that’s a bad idea as an unsupervised parrot regardless of how well home trained it may be can still get into trouble. Leaving it in a parrot room or cage is more ideal then having it free-range in the house.

So when you do leave it alone, what can you do to make sure the hours of loneliness will not drive them crazy…. There is so many different ways to keep your parrot stimulated that do not involve you having to be there:

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1) Provide toys
2) Provide foraging opportunities – don’t just free form feed
3) Leave the tv/radio on – just make sure it’s an appropriate channel and make sure the tv is far enough from the cage not to damage their eyesight
4) Record a recording of your voice reading stories or talking to your parrot

Also take in consideration that parrots do take naps during the day. You can also give them a nice shower before you leave so they will spend some of the time preening and drying off.

With all of these things to do, your little Parrotler (get it? Parrot toddler lol) should be okay to be left home alone without the chance of becoming bored and without the risk of damage being done to your household.

Grayson, the grey!

Grayson, The Grey

If there are other things you do when you leave your parrot alone please leave it in a comment below. Don’t forget to check out our other posts and click that like button if you like the posts! Please remember to follow us on here just fill out the below follow us option and we do have a YouTube channel (info is under the about us page).

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Positive Reinforcement Class

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Sunday, November 26th, 2017 I went to my very first in-person class for positive reinforcement. Overall, I would say it was a good experience. Everything that was taught wasn’t new to me as I just recently graduated from Susan Friedman’s LLA class but it was nice to do a personal, face to face session with a professional trainer as a refresher. What I learnt was so many people are working on delivering the same concept in their own way. POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT is becoming more and more well-known amongst animal trainers which is absolutely GREAT!

This is definitely something I would want to conduct in the future for parrot owners so I spoke to Kristi Fleming, avian behaviorist about what I needed to do to get properly qualified to become a parrot trainer/behaviorist/consultant. I also have another trainer I work with via email who has been EXCELLENT! I feel like I’m walking in the right direction.

If you know NOTHING about positive reinforcement than I definitely recommend attending a class like this.  You get a brief insight into positive/negative reinforcement, positive/negative punishment, bridging, target training, luring, shaping and a chance to hear other parrot owners’ thoughts and issues along with a professional’s opinion. There is A LOT of information out here, on the internet via blogs, Facebook groups, avian forums, YouTube etc… I am a big advocator for using them all to your advantage BUT I am also aware of all the wrong information that is being put out there. I am a part of so many of the above mentioned and honestly I hear wrong information being spit to people who ask for advice all the time. I use to try to give my two cents and correct the information but then I would get “Dogged” on so I have learned to keep my mouth shut which is SO unfortunate because the whole reason I started this blog and YouTube was to help others empower their parrots but instead I’m being silenced by “Caesar Milan” type people.

The point I’m trying to make is very little people look into taking classes like this and honestly it can only help you better your relationship with your parrot. When interacting with your parrot or when hearing advice from someone about what to do with your parrot ask yourself these two things:

“Is this trust-building or trust-destroying for our relationship?” – taken from Kristi Fleming.

Is this empowering the parrot? Am I giving the parrot a choice here or am I forcing the parrot? If the answer is yes then continue but if it is no or you have to really think about it then I would say PAUSE! Take a second and re-analyze the situation and see if there is another way to get the desire response out of  your parrot which would make your answer be a yes!

I totally enjoyed doing the class, it would have been more informative for me if I didn’t already have the education behind my belt but nevertheless I know if I was clueless this would definitely give me a lot to think about. It opened my eyes to realizing I still have a lot to learn regardless of my graduation of the LLA program.

Parenting Parrots

Bird Show and Expo Review

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I will give you a brief rundown, please watch the below video for a more detail review.

I went to the bird show on the Sunday of  the  event and it had a good turn out. Everyone was talkative and interactive. They had bird cages,  stands, play gyms, toys, food, parrots for the bird show and birds for sale. Everything seemed reasonably priced. For an example, they had a huge bird cage one that I could fit a macaw in for 300 CAD. Can’t find that type of deal anywhere!

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Cockatoos!!!

I’m really scared of my parrots catching a disease so the show allowed you to bring your own birds, I didn’t as people who were bringing in their birds were not required to show  proof of a recent vet visit. Even when we got back home, we stripped off our clothes and washed our hands before interacting with any of our flock.

I did purchase a few toys however they were all made of plastic so I would be able to disinfect them before giving them to my parrids.

Overall, it was a great experience and I would go back again in 2018 just to see how much more it evolves.

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A Golden Crowned Conure -My 1st time seeing one

Parenting Parrots

Potty Training Your Feathered Friend

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This. Like all topics regarding parrots is a touchy subject. Some believe that potty training your parrot will harm them causing them to hold their poop until you give the approval to go. I say yes, this is possible if you train your parrot to only go on command. I don’t train them by using a word or even a cue. All my parrots have the free will to go when they please just like my kids. I don’t expect my kids to hold it until I say its okay to go, so why would it be any different for my parrids.

I think this is an issue because people forget how intelligent these creatures are. They are, after all little toddlers. So how do I train a parrot to be potty trained? My answer is very simple, the same way you train a child.

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You watch when your parrot goes. So let’s say at 10:15am he used the potty wherever he was sitting. 15 minutes later he went again and then 15 minutes later he went again. At about 13 minutes, I’m going to ask the parrot to step up and bring him to where I want him to go, keep him there until he poops, make up a big commotion and give him a treat. Remove him from that perch and do it again right before he hits the next 15 minutes. So what I’m doing is bringing him to the designated spot at his timed intervals, praising and giving a treat. I still use the clicker as soon as he/she drops that poop, I click, praise and give a treat. This is the exact method I use for my kids minus the clicker hahaha. “Timed Potty Training“. I do this consistently every time the parrot is out of their cage until they start going on their own. I still click, praise and give a treat but I slowly diminish all three until the bird just goes on it’s own and comes back to resume the previous play/activity. If there are any accidents, just ignore it and resume as usual until the next interval. I find this method of potty training to be very successful just as it works for toddlers, it will work for a parrot. Please see below for our video from our Instagram page – feel free to follow us there also :).

This way the parrot isn’t waiting for me to tell them WHEN to go, they go when they need to. This method just teaches them WHERE to go. So we teach our toddlers to use “The potty” and from there, the big toilet, this is no different except it’s not a potty, it’s a potty perch hahaha. Some people train them to go back to their cage and that is also perfectly fine as it teaches them that releasing in the cage is appropriate. I have never had an issue with any of the parrots stopping the use of their cage and waiting for me to let them out before they go to the washroom however if it is something you are afraid of than once they learn where to go, you can also praise them when they are in their cage and they release, so they learn that is appropriate too.

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Next issue, what if you are on the road and you don’t have a potty perch? I, again have never had to worry about this because somehow they knew if I put them down on the floor that they were allowed to potty as long as it wasn’t on me. However to avoid them holding it in, once they are well established using the potty perch, ever so often you can use a word cue or hand signal to let them go poop. I do not recommend making it consistent as you don’t want them waiting for that cue before they  go to the washroom but you want them to still associate it as one of the signals just in case you are on the road and don’t have the potty perch. This isn’t really a worry because this method doesn’t make them hold it for you, just makes them not potty on you!

For an example, I went out with Nyx, my black-capped conure (she was on the harness)  and I realized damn, it’s been 25 minutes and I haven’t stopped for Nyx to use the washroom. Nyx usually goes every 14 minutes. So I stopped at a red light, opened my door, placed Nyx on the road, she automatically released herself, I praised her and put her back in the car, waited for the light to turn green and continued on our way. This was our first time in this situation and it worked out perfectly! We were out all day and no poop accidents. In this case, she held it until she was some place she could go but that is okay, just like when you are out and about and have to find a washroom before you can release yourself. As long as holding it in isn’t a habit, the fact that they do learn to, is a plus in my eyes.

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If your question is how is your parrot going to always make it to the potty perch then I’m going to assume your parrot has clipped wings and if that’s the case, YOU will always have to bring them. The parrids I’ve potty trained are all fully flighted. I’ll be playing with them,  not paying attention to the time and they will fly off, go to the perch and come right back to continue playing. This is just one of the many advantages to having a fully flighted parrot.

I hope this helped and if you like what you see please don’t forget to hit that follow button so you can stay posted on everything we post. Please follow us on YouTube (Information is posted in our about us page).


Parenting Parrots

Top 5 Things you should know about the Lorikeet Parrot

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Here is my list for the Top 5 things you need to know when having a Lorikeet as an owner lol.

1) Lorikeets make an EXCELLENT alarm
They are easily awoken and they wait until they sense danger and will send out a high pitch squeal to alarm the rest of the household. Even when they’re in their own world of playing, they can make noise. It’s amazing to watch them roll around on their backs with a ball in their mouth but yet they are still able to make lots of sounds.

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2) Lorikeets need to play
This is very important as Lorikeets are extremely intelligent and can get bored very easily. They have a very high energy level and needs constant supervision. Whether it is two or more lories playing, a lory playing with the toy in their cage or a lorikeet playing with you… Playing needs to be included someway, somehow.

3) Loud Volume
The noise level isn’t so bad if you can tolerate a loud pitch every now and then. With that being said, they are the most vocal and the highest pitch parrots I have EVER owned. But my green naped talks my head off lol and I can always see him listening so intensively to every word I say.

4) Specialized Diet
It’s true, they do require a specialized diet but to be honest it was hard at first but now after having them for a year, it’s almost (ALMOST LOL) like 2nd nature. They eat fruits and veggies along with wet and dry nectar.

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My 1 yr old Rasta!

5) Lorikeets have watery poop
This is just a given since their specialized diet is in a liquid form versus the pellet food that is for other birds. I don’t find this to be a negative though. Yes, they squirt their poop all over (YUCK) so it messes up your walls, floors, EVERYWHERE! But it’s a simple wipe off unlike other parrots’ poop that gets hard and you have to scrub it off with some elbow grease. Now the downfall can be if you don’t clean it daily (like a quick wipe off every day) then it can be more difficult to clean but at that point, I put the cage in the shower under hot water pressure and the cage usually washes right off without any more effort from me.

BONUS) LoriBites/ Nips are normal
This is not to say your bird should be biting you all the time however Lorikeets tend to nip/bite more than other parrots(I’m a bit on the fence about this one especially since I wrote a bite is YOUR fault). They might bite out of displeasure, out of frustration or because they are overly stimulated. Most times they are really excited and that’s why it happens once they have a bond with you, it isn’t to hurt you. The bite is not always a bad thing coming from a lorikeet, it just sucks for the person who is receiving the bite because of their narrow beak, they can draw blood pretty easily. My green naped uses his mouth on me a lot but most times it’s just exploring. I can tell the difference between him BITING and him playing with his beak on me. If you are a new lorikeet owner with time you will be able to tell the difference too.

With all this being said… I love having a green naped lorikeet and I can’t wait to see what else we do together and what else he may teach me or I him…

Green naped Lorikeet

Rainbow Lorikeet aka Green Naped

Parenting Parrots!

Birdtricks’ Steps

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I have to put all these training methods to the test before I can recommend them to my followers, so if you know of any other training methods out there please let me know… This one is www.birdtricks.com run by 2 brothers who have no formal training but claim to be able to change any behavioral issues your bird may have. As long as your parrot isn’t sick, they believe any problems can be fixed using their methods. Great!! So I have 7 parrots but I’m also trying out the Parrot Wizard’s methods so I have to be careful not to intertwine the two. The funny thing is I just found out the parrot wizard used to work for Birdtricks so I’m sure they are going to have some similarities.

If you look at my training for the Parrot Wizard I had 3 birds that I was trying the method on: Grayson, who is a 5 yr old African grey. Piper who is a 3 yr old Quaker parrot a.k.a monk parakeet and Marlee who was new to our flock at the time and was only a 4 and a half months old green-naped lorikeet. I didn’t stick to that training so I’ll be re-starting it over and some birds will have to be changed as Marlee was rehomed.

I will put Grayson and one of our new members who has yet to be introduced to you guys, a female baby violet Indian Ringneck on the Birdtricks program and the other new member which is a black lory along with Piper on the Parrot Wizard Program. I’m leaving out Rasta, Nyx and Ringo for now just in case I come across other bird training programs that I want to test out or that you guys find and want me to test out. Of course one for my own program which may have a combination of all the programs I test out or it may be something completely different, who knows but only time will tell.

So back to Birdtricks, right now I’m reading their pamphlet called New Parrot Care and I was told this is the first thing I should read and it is titled “How to get my parrot to love me“. Chapter one is setting up your parrot for success: Cage, diet, toys, perches, showers. Great! Grayson and the female Indian Ringneck (although she hasn’t gotten the bath thing down as yet but she’ll learn) is ready.

Chapter two covers things you can change without training such as the things I mentioned from chapter one. If you don’t have those already set for your parrot now is the time to fix it. I find that Birdtricks really focuses on the diet aspect of things and I do agree with them on that, a varied healthy diet with an organic based pellet is essential for optimal health for your parrot. They cover sleep, controlling your reaction, end all interactions on a positive note and learn to read body language. So Far I don’t disagree however they seem to stress on not letting the parrot be dominating, showing the parrot who is in charge and I’m sure they mean it in a nice way but that has rang a bell of warning for me. REMEMBER I BELIEVE IN EMPOWERING THE ANIMAL. So let’s see how this keeps going, I’m still keeping an open mind as they do talk about positive reinforcement being better than negative and I’m all for that!

Let’s move on as I know all these things about Grayson and the new IRN (Indian Ringneck) is pretty transparent as a baby right now. Chapter 3, they call it the most important step: Putting your bird on a training diet. They explain how to do it, why it works and to weigh your bird every day. I somewhat do this already although I don’t call it the training diet but I give them only enough food that they will eat in one sitting and I train before feeding them their main meal. You only need to do this if your reward for your parrot doing the right thing is a food reward, if not then implementing the training diet is not necessary. On my own note, if the rewards you are feeding is not in their regular diet then they should work for it whether or not they are on a training diet but I do understand you are NOT starving your parrot so what’s wrong with monitoring their intake? Also if you feed before their next meal you know they are almost getting to that hungry point where they start feeling peckish but their not fully hungry yet. It does help in the motivation process. You never want your parrot to be starving when training because let’s be real, I learn NOTHING when I’m hungry hahaha and I’m sure parrots are the same… Anyhow back to chapter 3. They end off chapter 3 with an introduction to my favorite bridge tool – The Clicker! They give you a clicker game to try on other humans to learn how to master using the clicker which I thought was a BRILLANT idea!! So yes Chapter 3 is on the same baseline as me, I am ready to move onto Chapter 4.

In Chapter 4, we actually learn more about using the clicker in your training. How to clicker train a bird that won’t take treats from your hand or one that is scared of your presence. As you know I’m a big advocate for the clicker, if you didn’t know please read my clicker training post ( which also has a YouTube video attached to it). It’s a very short chapter as it just focuses on getting your parrot to  know the clicker.

Chapter 5 is training the first behavior which is Target training, you have heard me talk about or seen me do YouTube videos showing this. So this is nothing new but I still did a 5 minute training with Grayson and the new IRN (Indian Ringneck) just to implement their first training session. Both of these birds are a pro at target training so this was easy and quick repetitions for them. You can read about my target training methods here.

They end off this book with a summary of things that you learned and why trick training is an important aspect to your bird’s life.

My Overall Thoughts: I would recommend getting this pamphlet for the first time bird owner or for a bird owner who is just starting to take an interest in training their parrots. I don’t know if it is available by itself as I got it in a package called “Basic Parrot Course: stop biting” which cost me $54.95USD. However if you know how to train your parrot and what’s needed in their development then this particular pamphlet may not be for you. I haven’t gotten through the rest of the course yet but will keep you posted.

I am just going through the package that they emailed me before anything else so the next one on the list I received is: How to Potty Train Your Parrot“. I truly don’t think it’s very important in the beginning of training your parrot however having a potty trained parrot saves you a lot of dirty clothes, dirty sheets, floor scrubbing etc. So look out for my review on that.

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Parenting Parrots!

Target Training

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You have just finished clicker training your parrot. You see it looking for the treat after it hears the click, so now your ready to move on…. NOW WHAT? WHAT’S NEXT?

Target training is your next best bet. Why? If you target train your parrot it will be easier to get your parrot to move from one place to another or get him/her to go where you want him/her to go. This is a convenient tool to have in your back pocket regardless if you have an amazingly obedient parrot. This is great to even teach tricks with, I’ve taught turn around with it several times. Another example of its use is if you have a parrot that doesn’t want to come out of its cage, you can target it out with the stick once it learns target training. It’s very useful!

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To start target training you need 3 items not including yourself and the bird.
1) A clicker (only needed if you are doing clicker training)
2) Target stick (I use a chopstick)
3) The bird’s favorite treat

You start by placing the target stick as close to the bird’s beak as possible (I would start this training in the parrot’s cage) but far enough that the bird has to open its mouth and touch it. Now different things can happen here, your bird can fly away to the other side of the cage or it can lean away from the stick or it can ignore it or just automatically touch it. Hopefully it’s the latter but if not, that’s okay. If your parrot flies away then we need to work on Trust exercises before this. Usually I would have just said to keep moving the stick to wherever the parrot goes until it finally touches the stick.  Then you would click, remove the stick and give a treat however this wouldn’t be very good for your parrot in the long run because it would be exposing them to”Flooding” and we want to stay away from that. So if your parrot is flying away, you need to stop here and go read this post first.

If your parrot is leaning away, you can keep the stick there and wait for the parrot to look at the stick (the parrot makes an acknowledgement of it) then click, remove the target stick and give a treat. You will continue doing this until the bird gets comfortable enough that when you do put the stick in front of its beak, it will nip at the stick. BINGO! Once the parrot does that, we are on the right track….

If your parrot ignores it, you can touch the stick to the parrot’s beak, click and give a treat. You want to be careful with this one, don’t overdo it because you don’t want the bird thinking your suppose to touch him/her and that’s how it receives the treat. So make sure you only do this a few times and give the bird a chance to touch the stick on its own.

Hopefully you are lucky and the parrot just touches the stick but that’s a hit and miss, it all depends on how well your parrot was socialized before you. So you place the stick in front of the parrot, he/she touches it, the exact moment they touch it, you click and give a treat. (If the parrot won’t take a treat from your hand – go back to the previous mentioned post or just drop the treats in the food bowl – your choice!). Once your parrot gets the hang of touching the stick when it is right in front of it, you’re going to slowly put more distance between the parrot and the stick therefore causing the parrot to have to move two or three steps to touch the stick then you’ll click and give a treat. Gradually extending the distance until you are able to put the stick anywhere in the cage and the parrot will move around the cage to touch the target stick. VIOLA! You have succeeded in teaching your precious feathered friend how to do target training!

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First Things to do with Your New Parrot

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You just got a new parrot, you are all excited and want to start playing with it right away. BAD IDEA!!! I don’t care if your parrot was the friendliest bird in the world at the breeder’s. The first time in a new home can be very traumatic and you should proceed with caution. If you know the bird is in a good place then this process should move by really fast for you.

1) You brought your bird home, you place the carrier or box inside the cage if you can and leave it open to let the bird come out into the cage when it feels comfortable. If you can’t put the box/carrier in the cage you have to find a way to quickly get the parrot from the carrier into the cage without any interaction.

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Purrain’s 1st time in the house

2) Leave the bird alone so it can observe it’s surroundings and get comfortable – 24 hours if you can.

3) Do trust building exercises (day 2):
Sit and read softly by the cage
Sing nursery songs
talk on your phone but quietly
eat beside the cage
Basically you want to do calming activities that don’t involve a lot of movement or loud noises and ignore the bird (I know this is the hard part but think about the long term affects over short term gain)

If you do this and see that the bird is not cowering away from you, not showing any fear but instead is coming to the side of the cage where you are sitting and interested in you then I would do the same thing but with the door open. Before opening the door though you might want to just put your hand on the cage near the bird to test out it’s comfort level with hands and if all is well then teach clicker training, target training and step up training in the cage presenting treats through the bars but if your not interested in those things then go ahead and open the door.

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Purrain listening to me read

What you are doing by opening the door is inviting the parrot to come out and explore without any pressure from you. This is the ideal situation but sometimes things aren’t so pretty and simple. If not, then you need to go back to the very beginning and sit further away from the cage until the parrot shows calming responses and you can slowly move closer.

More trust building exercises include the”Blinking game”, the”sleeping game”,  basically copying games. When you can successfully say you have accomplished these you are ready for Clicker training, target training and step up training.

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Purrain Engaged

A lot of people are impatient and want to let their bird out right away. I only say not to do this because you can open the cage door, your  parrot comes out but then wont let you put it back in. Therefore causing a good experience to turn bad and you want to avoid bad experiences.

If you are interested in seeing Purrain’s 1st days home please subscribe to our youtube channel so you don’t miss out. Also if you want to learn more about trust building exercises please click on the follow button so you don’t miss any new postings that might be able to help you and your feathered friend!

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Finally out of the cage

Parenting Parrots

Birdtricks’ Potty Training Review

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Without releasing their methods or ideas I will keep this post short.

I don’t agree with how they potty train their parrots so with that being said I will not be implementing it or trying it. It’s not that it’s a bad method and they do also suggest my method but I just don’t think their way should be encouraged. We have similar starts but their finish and my finish is two different goals, so I don’t recommend buying this booklet. However the concept they use is the same across the board so if you absolutely have no idea where to start, I guess it’s not a bad option to look into. Now, like U always say, every Parrot owner has different methods so if you do buy it and think it’s the way you want to go then great but for me, it just isn’t the best option.

If you really want to know how to potty train your parrot the “Parenting Parrots” way I will be posting that in my next post so look out for that.

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Parenting Parrots!

To Clip or Not to Clip? That is the Question

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I will be completely honest, I blame clipping of my Galah Cockatoo’s wings to be the cause of her death(Will be a storytime on our Youtube channel). Overall, she felt incomplete as a bird and because she barely had learned how to fledge at that time, she never understood the importance of her wings hence her breaking them every time they grew in. A lot of people clip their birds’ wings and justify it for different reasons, I don’t argue with anyone. I listen and understand their point of view but you know what my thought on it comes down to?!? THEN DON’T GET A BIRD!!

A bird is meant to fly, are you still a bird if you can’t fly?? I think that makes them a chicken or a turkey or a rooster but definitely not a bird…. I will never tell someone they are wrong for clipping but is it not selfish to clip a bird because you can’t take the proper precautions to keep them safe? Wouldn’t it be better to leave them in the pet store or at the breeder’s house so someone who doesn’t have to risk their “winglyhood”, for safety can take them? I’ve heard about many accidents with parrots who have flown away or flew into a fan, etc :(. But couldn’t those have been prevented?  Such as making sure windows and doors aren’t opened when the bird is out or by turning off that fan? Maybe I just don’t understand as I’m not in those situations to have to make those type of decision but regardless let’s think about the bird.

To Clip

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Part of a bird’s anatomy is their wings just like humans, it’s their legs. Let’s say someone broke my legs and said no worries it will fix, it’s only temporary. In that time frame I’m paralyzed, I can’t move like I want to – I am at the beck and call of others. I have to rely on others as I can’t do for myself like I normally would, this is the same for clipped birds. Now some people may say nope! It’s not like that. Clipping wings is more like getting a haircut as it doesn’t hurt the bird and it will grow back. Yes that is all true however it is still temporarily paralyzing them from making the decision to flight or fight.

I have clipped birds but they are only clipped because they came to me that way so I patiently wait it out until their wings grow back in. I used to clip my parrots’ wings all by myself, I have also went to the vet to get it done. I never thought anything more about it until I started watching and observing my birds and realizing how BEAUTIFUL it was to see them spread their wings and fly. I love it! I haven’t clipped my African grey in 4 years and although he barely flies whenever he does, I feel like a proud mommy.

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A lot of behavioral issues can arise from having a clipped parrot because of the lack of exercise. Flying is so important to parrots, it’s how they release all that built up energy so if you add flying plus foraging plus training and the perfect diet – YOU CAN ACQUIRE THE PERFECT PET! But without the flying aspect, what exercise can you give a parrot that would release the same amount of exercise that flying for 30 mins a day would help them release? One thing I used to do when Grayson’s wings were clipped is have him come out of the cage, I would hold on to his feet and tell him to flap his wings. He was great at it but it definitely was not releasing the same amount of energy that flying would have.

Once, I clipped Piper’s wings because people said it would make him easier to train and manage. Well let me tell you – I received a MONSTER from that. He went from never biting to always biting. He was miserable being clipped and now that he isn’t clipped anymore, he is back to his normal self. Yes, he flies from me but I understand that is his way of communicating to me to let me know he either had enough or is bored with what I’m doing etc….

There will always be pros and cons to clipping and not clipping your bird’s wings. It truly comes down to a personal preference. Do what’s best for you and for your parrot so you can both enjoy all that life has to offer.

 

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5 yr old Grayson

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Parenting Parrots!