Boss’ near Death Experience!

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Boss, our 1-year-old lovebird has truly been through a lot this past year and unfortunately she had to encounter another problem before this year was over. I have to say for a small parrot she has enormous strength and determination. Boss has really shown that she is a fighter against all odds.

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Love birds images

Boss has always been ms. Houdini but this time I think someone forgot to lock her cage properly because I just can’t see how she would have been able to escape. Anyhow she did and for some odd reason, she decided to go to our African Grey’s cage. I had just put him back in his cage and was cleaning his water bowl when I heard him banging something in his cage. He is a banger so this is normal. I walked back and he had something yellow… WAIT… Grayson’s only yellow toy I had just thrown out so what is he banging?? As I approached his cage to put back the water, he dropped his yellow package and the package ran out of the bottom of his cage. To my horror, it was Boss, our one year old peach-faced lovebird. I didn’t even know Boss could fit through the gaps of Grayson’s cage until I seen her run out. MY HEART DROPPED. I screamed at the top of my lungs as what just occurred slowly registered in my head. I wanted to cry! At that very moment, I was petrified.

I went to find Boss who was huddled in a corner. I picked her up and examined her. I was so afraid I was going to lose her. Boss has some blood coming out one of her ears and her beak was purple and blue.  I wrapped her in a rag and held her. I wanted to bring her to the vet but silly me just used their credit card to cover a purchase and had said I would put back the money off my next pay not realizing that something would come up and I would be needing it (talk about bad timing). So bringing her to the vet at this time, was out of the question. I tried to nurse her back to health but I was worried about her internal organs. I set up a “get well cage” which is really small but felt it would be perfect for her under the circumstances.

I gave her a bath everyday, kept her warm, served her warm baby food with her pellets mixed in it, fresh clean water and weighed her all the time. Birds like to hide their sickness so there is no way of knowing if they are ill until it is too late. Weighing Boss daily let me know that she wasn’t losing weight and was eating as she normally would so she probably wasn’t going to die.

It’s now been almost 2 weeks and her beak is back to a light peach bone like color with no purple or blue marks. She is vocalizing again (she had stopped for a while). She is moving all over her “get well cage” and she is back to training!

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Boss doing “touch/grab” taming. I call it the hovering method.

Til this day, I don’t know what exactly  happened on that day or how it happened but all I know is please double-check your locks when closing your pets’ cages especially if you have other pets around.

Parenting Parrots!

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The Cons/ The Negatives / The ugly

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Just like having kids, you love them one minute and questioning why you had them the next haha, same goes for having parrots. There are pros and there are cons to owning parrots. Whether you have multiple or one, these negatives may still apply. Hopefully with the right type of training and time with your parrids (parrot kids), these negatives may be minimized.

Every parrot owner or wanna-be parrot owner should know that parrots are messy. You may have a parrot that throws its food out of the cage, meaning it could end up on your walls, your floor, your furniture etc… Parrots who aren’t potty train will poop anywhere and everywhere. Could be on you, on your furniture, your floor, your wall etc… My African Grey will poop out of his cage. Don’t forget the feathers / dander dust that parrots produce, that is also messy and makes you need an air filter. Some parrots make less dander than others so if you are worried about that, you got to do research. Let’s remember to think of the toys that they destroy because that’s what they do. They don’t “play” with their toys, they DESTROY them haha.

Parrots make noise. You can get a parrot that is known to be more on the quieter side of the noise scale but they will still make some type of noise. It could be them making normal bird noises or mimicking human speech or copying household noises or other pets etc… Noise will be there. Also there are some parrots that turn into screamers which makes it even worse for your ears.

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Parrots are “beakers”. Meaning they use their beaks for everything! To test things out, to eat, to BITE, to check the balance stability of perches. So biting may happen, it doesn’t have to but it can. Nipping will definitely be a stage they go through. As a parrot owner you have to understand the risk. You might even have a parrot who will literally charge and attack! Some bites can send you to the hospital depending on the bite force and the type of beak you are dealing with.

Parrots are time-consuming. They can not just be left in a cage or else they will become very lil’ destructive, unmanageable monsters. You got to give them some time, especially to train them and tame them. They need to shower and stretch. Like I always say, ” parrots are toddlers just in parrot form“. So all the work you would put into a toddler, you need to do the same for your parrot. Bathing them, cleaning up after them, making them meals, putting them to sleep, waking them up, taking them to the doctors, playing with them, teaching them, giving them outside time that I call “Park time”.

Parrots are expensive. The cost of the bird, the cage, the food, the treats, the training tools, the perches, the toys, the vet bills and these are all on going costs minus the bird and the cage. You will always be buying food, treats, toys. Perches will get worn out and eventually need to be replaced. Vet bills  – you are supposed to take your parrot to the vet every 6 months and they cost way more than taking a dog or cat. So you have to take all of the money you will be dishing out for the rest of your parrot’s life into consideration. Now there are ways to minimize these costs  but that means more work and time on your part.

Information on specific species is HARD to find sometimes. I recommend always doing research and reading on your specific species. As a matter of fact, one of the required items you should have in your household when owning a parrot is a book on that specific species. Here is a link to some of the books I have in my collection: http://astore.amazon.ca/parentingparrot-20 (check it out, you might find a good book for yourself that you can order).

And last but not least that I can think of is MOOD SWINGS! Parrots just like kids, grow and go through a hormonal stage. A lot of parrots get re-homed at this stage because owners don’t understand what is going on to their parrot and just gets rid of it. Parrots aren’t perfect and they can get mad, sad, upset, happy, frustrated… etc just like we can. They can throw temper tantrums just like toddlers. They will test your limits just like kids do.They are very intelligent and have emotions and feelings. Treat your parrot like a family member because that IS exactly what they are – one of your kids.

Below is my video on my 5 cons to owning a parrot.

Parenting Parrots!

The Test -Chapter 4 – Week one and week two update

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Week one was pretty straight forward, I just made sure my “parrids” ( get it??! Parrot kids – PARR from parrots and IDS from kids lol… My new word – I’m going to have to start an index if I keep this up.) knew everything they needed to and were ready to start the The Parrot Wizard’s Guide to Well-Behaved Parrots

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The Parrot Wizard’s Guide to Well-Behaved Parrots

Chapter 4 is called “Taming and Training”. He covers the different type of punishment and reinforcement terms he will be using. He has sections on Motivation, Food Management, Clicker Conditioning, Target Training, Step up,  Touch/Grab, Towelling and Turning on Back. I refused to look at Chapter 5 until I spent at least 2 weeks in Chapter four. I also want to say before doing all of this it is important to have done some trust building exercises because I feel that makes or breaks your relationship with your parrots.

Day one (Saturday November 5):
         Today, I weighed and monitored my parrids making sure I watched how much they ate in a serving, how much they didn’t eat etc. I implemented the first two sections: Motivation and food management. I did absolutely no training with them as I wanted to follow the book as close as possible and not fall back into my old habits of training. So a pretty boring day.

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Ringo on our scale

Day Two (Sunday November 6):
          Today was clicker conditioning day, making sure all my parrids especially my focus subjects knew what a clicker was. I took them out in the morning, did 10 minutes of clicker training and then put them back in their cages for them to enjoy their breakfast. I did a second training session in the evening before bed. All the parrids already knew the clicker but some became stronger trainees after this. Maybe it is just my mind playing tricks on me but I think by spending the time to really make them understand what a clicker’s purpose is, did in fact help me with training Marlee. Everyone else I didn’t see a difference as they were properly introduced to the clicker. I think with Marlee, I must have missed a step because I believe she never truly understood the sound of the clicker. Also with Ringo, (Even though he isn’t part of the focus subjects) I was still using the clicker far away from him as he was afraid of the sound, I now can use the clicker right by him. So call me crazy but I think by really taking the time to introduce the clicker versus just starting to train with it, makes a difference. Check out the video below of how to properly clicker train your parrot which can technically work for any animal that can be trained.

Day Three and day four (Monday November 7 & Tuesday November  8):
   
     Today was target training day, my parrids also already know target training so it was another easy task for me to do.  I did two 10 minute sessions a day. Day three I focused on doing target training inside of the cage. Day four was target training outside the cage. All parrots were very successful as expected. For those who don’t know what target training is. It is a “Chopstick”, clicker and a treat. You put the stick some where, the parrot moves towards it and touches it, you click and give the treat. If your parrot doesn’t know target training, you put the stick right in front of them and wait until they touch it. Do that a few times and slowly move the stick further and further out of their reach until they have to actually move to touch it.


Day Five and day six (Wednesday November 9 and Thursday November 10):
       “Step up”, “Step up”, “Step up”. I tried to follow all his instructions but I have to admit for the parrots that already knew step up, I had to kind of just go over my previous step up sessions. What he says in the book makes sense though because there are times that I go to step up a parrot and it moves away from me. He recommends to teach your parrots to step up by targeting – I think that’s a great idea however I was having a difficult time with it. I did what worked for me and all my parrots were successful except… I found that Marlee is actually afraid of hands so I had to revert back to trust building exercises and target training her inside of her cage. Piper is afraid of perches, so I slowly been introducing him to different perches. I couldn’t do step up by targeting so I taught step up the only way I know how by simply asking the parrot to step up on different perches.

Day 7 (Friday November 11):
            I read over the sections of touch/grab, towelling and turning on back. I was already familiar with towelling as it is something I do every now and then with Grayson, my african grey. The touch/grab method is going to need more time for me to grasp the concept and the turning on back, some of my parrids already do however it wasn’t taught to them as he describes it so I will also have to work with them on this. Basically my training session on Friday was simply just going over target training and stepping up. This concluded my 1st week of trying to train my parrids off of The Parrot Wizard’s Guide to Well-Behaved Parrots

Conclusion: So far, so good. He covers the basics which is important to be successful in the training process and he is teaching things that will help with the basics that parrots are exposed to such as vet visits, grooming etc… If you teach your parrot towelling that eliminates the fear of when the vet wraps them in a towel. If you teach touch/grab that eliminates the fear of when they have to be grabbed out of their carrier and held for the vet. If you teach turning on back, that eliminates the stress of when the vet is checking them out and grooming them. Step up helps you be able to transport your parrot whenever you want. Target training is just a basic method needed to continue the training process in my eyes anyways. Clicker training is the perfect “bridge” to let a parrot know they did an excellent job and will be rewarded for it.    

Week Two:

Day 8 ( Saturday November 12) – Day 14 (Friday November 18):
        This week I continued doing target training in and out of the cage. I continued teaching step up however not by the book standards but by my way of teaching it, getting them used to hands and different perches. I really focused on trying to teach touch/grab, towelling and turning on back however I only got to do touch/grab and even that I didn’t finish. Hovering your hand over a parrot’s head is something that we are taught from the very beginning not to do, as it is like a predator for them but this is exactly what touch/grab is telling you to do. I was able to touch some of the parrids but Piper and Marlee are not that strong in stepping up with different perches and especially Marlee who doesn’t like hands – I didn’t even bother to attempt this with them. So the only test subject that was exposed to this was Grayson and I’m now really close with my hand over him however I started off really far away but I’m still not touching him. I also did this with Nyx, my black-capped conure who I can touch on her head and back with my hand hovering over her. He does tell you in the book that these methods are taming methods and may take a while before you are able to reap the benefits so as of Saturday November 19, I will be reading chapter 5 and moving on while continuing to work on “taming” my parrids more.

Update (Thursday November 30th, 2017: This was started November of 2016 and then I  had stopped implementing it well I started this process all over and I can hover my hand over Piper and Purrain (irn) but did a good distance away. Towelling, I might try teaching it the way I taught it to Grayson as The Wizard’s way seems as though it would take longer. Turning on back – I am only able to do with Nyx (even though she is not one of the test subjects.)

Parenting Parrots!

I’m Sorry

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Some days are GREAT days! While others are…. NOT so great! How does one bounce back from a “NOT so great day” when it not only affects you but your little toddlers too?

Today was one of those days for me! So this is my rant! Everything was on schedule, I trained each bird, gave them breakfast, cleaned the house, spent time with each bird and then I don’t know what happened… While I was doing all of that, I was thinking about what I wanted to share with you guys today and what I was going to put up on our youtube channel tomorrow. However it is now 11:45pm and I’m just now sitting down to write to you. I’m sorry. I usually work really hard on my posts and try to make sure I do research and have pictures etc… Today is just NOT one of those days. So not only am I letting you down but I’m letting myself down and my birdies down because I did not do a 2nd training session as I usually do.

When I decided to blog and make videos, it never dawned on me that it would be time consuming. For those who don’t know… IT IS VERY MUCH TIME CONSUMING! If you don’t LOVE what you are writing about or making videos about – IT will be more of a chore then a hobby. For me, it is a split between a hobby and a job because I want to make sure I give you interesting, fun, educational information but at the same time I want it to be professional and consistent. IF this was just my hobby then I would only do it when I had time but for me, “THIS IS MY WHOLE LIFE” so I try to be as consistent as possible. I have a goal, I have a plan and I have a routine that I want to stick to, which makes this harder when I put deadlines on it. Well, I seem to work well under pressure so I guess this works for me.

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Today was one of those days that I think about why I write… Does anyone care what lil’ old me has to say?  Then I meet people that ask for my help and I smile and feel like “this is why I write“, so others know I’m here! I’m here and I’m not going any where! There are days that I look and my stats say I only had 2 visitors. ONLY 2 visitors!? In a whole 24 hours?? No comments, no likes, no emails, no followers added… Is it a sign that people don’t care about what I have to say? Or do I use it as a push? I use it as a push! Maybe my content isn’t as appealing as I think, maybe I’m missing something in my writing, maybe I need to add some sort of twist… What makes one website get followers added every day while others struggle just to get one or two??  How come some blogs get hundred and thousands of likes and comments while others get none? I, unfortunately do not have the answer to these questions but I will keep pressing on until I figure it out.

Okay, I’m going to go now as I think I’ve ranted enough hahaha plus it’s now after midnight and although the parrots are sleeping, I still have 3 beautiful children that have decided tonight is not the night to follow curfews hahaha. It’s okay, thank  God it’s Saturday and tomorrow is another weekend day where I plan to be VERY PRODUCTIVE! One unproductive day a month, I will allow myself so today was it for November… NEVER AGAIN until maybe DECEMBER hahaha.

Although this wasn’t on my original topic and NOTHING like any of my other posts, I hope you still enjoyed it nevertheless. Please feel free to check out my other posts while you are here and DEFINITELY click that add to followers button so you can get updates about my other fun and entertaining topics haha or just do it to make me feel better – that works also….

Bye for now!

 

 Parenting Parrots!

I don’t deserve to be in JAIL!!

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So imagine this…

You are born, taking care of, SOLD and moved to a new home. You will probably be experiencing some anxiety, nervousness, excitement all while being scared. You get to your new location and BAM they put you in a four wall room with bars, never to release you again…. What will happen to you?

Let’s break this down for a second, first you are born. Whether it is in a hospital, in your home or wherever, point being a birth has  to happen. This is the same for parrots and humans.

 

Next, you are taking care of by a parent who feeds you. Maybe this is by breast milk, formula or some sort of supplement, but you need to receive nourishment to survive. This is the same for parrots and humans.


Now the part you are probably wondering about is being “sold”. For some of us this never happens, we get to grow up with our parents and move out when we mature and can handle our own. So we will never know the feeling of our “parents” giving us away however some people do experience this via adoption or abandonment. I know when I was growing up, finding babies in dumpsters or staircases was a topic on the news. Parrot mothers may give up on their offspring also for whatever reason, they will stop feeding them, caring for them or just kill them. Now unfortunately within the human species, we also have mothers and fathers who kill their children. All in all, I rather be sold, if I can’t be loved. But the type of “selling” that I know of is either trafficking or when colored people were being sold as slaves. Again, if parrots are born in captivity then they will also be sold to a new owner.

 

After being sold comes the transition process of moving to a new home. Whether it is a voluntary move or an involuntary move, the fact is, there is a move. So kids who have been adopted, baby parrots that are sold and people who kill are moved to their new homes. Now for a child who has been adopted, we pray that they are going to a place that is comfortable, welcoming and wonderful overall. For a baby parrot we pray for the same. For the people who have forgotten their purpose to provide and protect their children, we pray that they get the help they need and live out the rest of their lives behind bars. The issue I present here, is a parrot being moved to a new home to live out its life behind bars. It did not commit murder, it did not lie, steal or do anything that should cause it to be incarcerated, so why should it have to deal with this punishment? Those parrots are screaming “I don’t deserve to be in Jail!”

My understanding of the reasons of incarceration is to rehabilitate the prisoner to eventually be able to transition back into society as a new model citizen. Why would an innocent baby parrot have to be exposed to the same faith?

 

Maybe its lack of knowledge on the owner’s part but ignorance is not acceptable. Maybe the parrot is displaying behavioral issues, does that mean if you have a child who has a disorder, would it be safe to say they would be exposed to the same type of confinement? NO, it is not okay!!

If humans can go “crazy” by being stuck in a 4 wall room day in and day out. Why wouldn’t a parrot who has the intellectual level of a toddler suffer the same faith?? I know sometimes we don’t think of these things, we just think “hey, they would be cute to have”. Not thinking about the work, effort, time or the parrot’s value of life.

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A parrot’s cage is their home just like your house is your home. You clean it, cook, eat, sleep and play in your house, well a parrot does the same thing in its house. Do you need to leave your house to visit friends, buy groceries or just need time out of the house?? Well, your parrot needs the same thing. Do you re-arrange your house from time to time? Well, your parrot needs the same thing.

If you neglect the parrot’s home, it can get sick just like you can get sick from an untidy place. If you never leave the confinements of your house, chances are you will suffer from a mental breakdown. Your parrot can go through the same issues. Feather plucking and screaming are  just a few ways that an isolated parrot may release its frustrations.

So many comparisons between human and parrots. We all have similarities, so humans don’t want to grow up in jail….Therefore your parrot does not deserve to be in jail!

 

 

 

Do unto others as you would like them to do onto you.

Please do not neglect and leave your parrots in cages all day. Their intellectual level may surprise you. That is why here at Parenting Parrots, we urge you to think of your parrot as your toddler because you and your parrot will have a better relationship and life together just by thinking of this simple thing: “I’m a parent to a toddler just in parrot form”.

 (None of the pictures in this post belonged to me)

Parenting Parrots!

 

 

Parrot Wizard’s Guide to the Test

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Hey everyone!

So I found the Parrot Wizard on YouTube and absolutely fell in LOVE with his two parrots, mostly his Senegal as he was displayed more often. Anyhow he apparently tamed a re-home macaw in 6 months, that’s what really caught my attention. I decided to buy his book – The Parrot Wizard’s Guide to Well-Behaved Parrots. I haven’t finished reading it completely however I have decided to put him to the test. There are things in there that I don’t agree with however just like parents of kids have different views and opinions on raising kids, I feel the same thing applies when raising parrots.

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The Parrot Wizard’s Guide to Well-Behaved Parrots

Whether I agree with him or not the end results still speak for themselves, he has two very well-trained (behaved) parrots that all of us dream of having. I consider most of my parrots to be well-behaved however let me be honest there are times that they make me want to jump off a cliff hahaha or at least make me question if they have a split personality. So what I decided to do is take 3 out of 7 of my parrots to follow his book instructions to the tee.

In the first chapter he talks about getting a parrot, I feel he spends a lot of time trying to tell people not to get a parrot although he claims otherwise. If I wasn’t already a parrot owner, I would have been turned off of owning one. With that being said though, he isn’t wrong in his description of how much work owning a parrot is. He also talks about getting as much information as you can on that specific species – I’m TOTALLY an advocate for getting a book on the bird you have or want. I so agree! Number One recommendation!!!! So there is nothing I need to implement from chapter one as I already have a parrot, I have a book on the parrot and I have brought my parrot to the vet, so health check – DONE!

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The Parrot Wizard with the re-home macaw

Let’s move on to chapter two. In this chapter he talks about your living arrangements. All hazardous items have already been removed from my household, each parrot has its own cage with the correct bar spacing. I have the list of things he requires and all my parrots have perches and toys. The transition from carrier to cage was different for all my parrots however it’s already been done so moving on…. Chapter two – DONE!!

Chapter 3 is called early interactions, he briefly covers trust building (which I do agree is the Number one thing needed in order to have a great relationship with your parrot – this is what my e-book will be about). This chapter also includes desensitization methods, nutrition, treats and sleep. Okay, so I already have my parrots on a healthy diet, I know their treats and although he recommends 12 -14 hours of sleep – my parrots are getting 10 – 12 hours so I still think that is good. As for desensitization – I believe this area is an ongoing section, as you will always be trying to desensitize your parrots to things. In regards to not being afraid of you, yes I got that down so chapter three – DONE!!

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The Parrot Wizard with his two parrots

Chapter 4 is where I am going to start putting his methods to the test. This is his taming and training chapter. He discusses positive reinforcement, motivation, food management, clicker conditioning, target training, step up, touch/grab, towelling and turning on back.

So I have elected 3 parrots to do his methods: Grayson, piper and Marlee. I choose these 3 because they are the most different in behavior right now.

Grayson has already been trained but I will be going back to the basics and seeing how he reacts to each of the Parrot Wizard’s methods. Maybe I can improve his training, who knows. **UPDATE** Grayson will be trained using Birdtricks methods!!

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Grayson

Piper loves to train but likes to be in control so we’ll see if he will change under these circumstances.

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Piper!!

Marlee is the newest one to the flock. She has learned to step up and started showing that she gets potty training but I haven’t done much more with her than that. **UPDATE** Marlee has been rehomed and is doing great in her new home

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Marlee @ 18 weeks and 4 days old ( 4 and a half months old)

I will do reviews on their weekly progress. Today, Saturday November 5th, 2016 is our first day….

**UPDATE** This training will still be done on Piper and I will be using one of our newest members a Black Lory

Parenting Parrots!

The Hard-boiled Egg

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I eat it, the kids eat it, so why wouldn’t the birds eat it?

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Put on a pot to boil. Once the water starts boiling, you put in the egg. I boil the egg for 10 minutes when I’m making it for the parrots. Take it out, let it cool and then SMASH IT!!! Don’t remove the shell, you just mash it all up together. My birds eat this all up.

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You can feed eggs to your parrots twice a week (no more than twice in one week) however I only feed it once a week. I’m not sure why but I have never done it more than once.

The benefits of eggs for your parrots are:
It helps their bones, beaks and feathers while also improving their eye vision

Parenting Parrots!

Roudybush Lory Nectar 15

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When I got my lorikeets, I kept them on the nectar that the breeder had them on but after a month when I needed to get another package, I decided to try a cheaper nectar. So at my favorite shop they had the Roudybush Lory Nectar 15 going for $16.75 CAD for a 1 lb bag so I decided to try it. That was a positive since it’s not expensive at all. The front of the bag reads, “No added colors or fragrances, and no animal byproducts”. So another positive…. Okay so far, we are off to a good start with this product.

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When I brought it home I was mixing it with the original nectar to slowly get the birds used to it. This 1 lb bag for 2 lories lasted me only 2 weeks. That was my final complaint – I thought 1 lb would last me at least a month especially since I’m also feeding them other foods.

My first complaint was the look of the nectar. It had bits of brown stuff in it and I wasn’t used to that so automatically I was wondering if it was good. I checked the expiry date which was June 2018 so this is obviously normal parts of this mix.  One positive was that this could be served as dry food. Unfortunately my birds aren’t used to dry so they didn’t touch it when I tried serving it as dry.

I didn’t want to use a blender as I don’t do batches. I mixed it, as I needed it, so the same mixing container I got from the breeder is what I was mixing this in. Directions read:

“One part dry nectar to 3 parts water” ” Wet nectar should be discarded after 3-4 hours”

My second complaint was the smell, I found the odor to be strong and stinky – definitely not a smell I liked.

After 3 hours, the nectar was chalky looking – My 3rd complaint. (I had a picture but looks like it got deleted, my apologies).

This is just my personal opinion, some people like this product. I know someone who mixes it with Karo syrup and says his lories love it. I didn’t try mixing it with anything but water. I know roudybush also has pellets for lorikeets but I have only tried this product from their line. My lorikeets ate it no problem, it was just me that didn’t like it.

Guaranteed Analysis
Crude Protein Minimum – 15.0%
Crude Fat Minimum – 3.5%
Crude Fiber Maximum – 0.5%
Moisture Maximum – 12.0%

Ingredients:

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My review has 3 pros and 4 cons for the Roudybush nectar 15.

If anyone else has lories, what do you feed them and what are your thoughts on the roudybush nectar 15?

Parenting Parrots!

Green naped Lorikeets

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So my last addition to our flock is a handful but because there is two of them, I decided to put their information together as usually what I do with one, I would do with the other. With that being said, they are still like night and day. In the picture below Marlee is the one furthest from the camera. I find her to be more standoffish, harder to tame and truly just wants her brother. Whereas in Rasta (the one closest to the camera) is all about having fun. It doesn’t matter if he is with us or his sister as long as he is having a good time. He gives me kisses and doesn’t mind the human interaction. Separately, I don’t find them noisy however together…. Makes me crazy! HAHAHA

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Green – naped lorikeets at 9 weeks old!

There isn’t a lot of information available online about these parrots, I guess because they are known to be really messy and loud, most people stay away from them. They aren’t as popular as the other parrots but they are a blast and although at times I wonder if I should have only stuck with one, I do love them both.

I think of them like bees as I have to make them nectar which is their main source of food however I am learning about their diet as each day goes on and it’s actually fun to try different foods with them. I haven’t found a great book on them but  I have read this book. It gives very basic information but it’s not expensive so a good buy if you want to get a better idea of what this species is about (or you could just click that follow button and learn with us as we go along hahaha – no pressure).

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Almost 6 weeks old

I also got this picture book for my kids to look at before we got our lorikeets. It was a nice way to get them involved.

I followed them from 5 weeks old until the day I got to bring them home. The breeder was very informative and sent me pictures of them every week. I had also given her a harness ( I highly recommend harness training) to start training them but I have since ceased using that, as I need them to get completely comfortable with me first. When I purchased them, I was told to put them in the same cage but no matter how many times I took them out, I found that they were still very protective and always wanted to be together. Which in turn left us with getting nipped a lot. I joined a bird forum which discussed lorikeets and was told to separate them, so I did. I switch their cages every week as one cage is bigger than the other. It eliminates them getting protective over their cage but also doesn’t make one feel like I favor one over the other hence why he/she got the bigger cage. This way they both get a turn. Since then, the nipping has stopped or at least lessened.

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9 weeks old

I have trained them to step up even though Marlee still needs work on that concept. I am trying to potty train them but Marlee doesn’t want to stay with us so she will fly off and end up pooping wherever it lands so until she gets the hang of step up, I doubt I will be successful with potty training her. Rasta has started target training but taking my time as I want to get it on video for you guys.

They  are definitely a more high maintenance type of parrot. I like having them because they have amazing personalities so that makes up for all the extra work however I’m still trying to learn to adjust to living with them regarding cleaning, feeding and just overall day-to-day activities.

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Marlee @ breeders

I don’t feel like I have unlocked their full pet potential as yet but we have to remember they are still only babies and as of today, Nov. 2nd, 2016 I have only had them for 2 months. There is so much to learn and understand about these little guys, some days I feel overwhelmed with all the information I am trying to go through. As I find out more I will keep you guys updated.

One thing about green naped Lorikeets is that they are amazing flyers, watching them soar is just astonishing.

Parenting Parrots!